The website uses cookies. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies as described in the Privacy Policy.
I Agree
blank_error__heading
blank_error__body
Text direction?

How Technology Can Help With Dorm to Hospital Transition

  • August 10, 2020

With the majority of dormitories having security check-ins through automatic badges or at the very least physical keys, you can limit entrance strictly to hospital staff. With the right technology in place, restricting this access however does not mean restricting communication. Using the same system as above, hospital staff can screen patients before they enter the building using a temporary kiosk solution. When a patient arrives at the kiosk a staff member can enable two-way communication via an intercom to discuss their symptoms and help determine whether or not they can be permitted in the building. Once permitted, staff can give them access to the building from their device and communicate with those inside the building through phones, computers, and monitors to make sure the patient is routed where they need to go.

Once inside the building, this same technology can be applied to certain floors or areas of the building where patients need more monitoring or have more urgent needs. Staff inside of the rooms are able to communicate with those outside of the room using that same network connecting through phones, computers and monitors that may not have been previously connected. In addition, patients can be given tablets/kiosk devices which allow them to easily communicate with staff if they are in need of assistance or have an urgent need.

Maximizing Alert Systems
Another system that can be enhanced through communication connectivity is emergency alerting and response. The existing technology in dorms include fire panels, alarms, various sensors and emergency alert buttons. While previously utilized in case of an emergency, these units can be used to help create a network of connectivity for essential communication.

For example, an alarm can be set up to be triggered if a door is opened. More specifically, that alert can be assigned to a certain staff member or group rather than alerting everyone. For example, a nurse on a certain floor can be notified that one of their patients has opened a door without notifying other floor nurses. Similarly, the security team can be notified if a door has been propped open or a locked door broken into posing any kind of security threat. By connecting all of your emergency alert systems you are able to communicate the right message to the right people at the right time.

Measure
Measure
Related Notes
Get a free MyMarkup account to save this article and view it later on any device.
Create account

End User License Agreement

Summary | 7 Annotations
With the majority of dormitories having security check-ins through automatic badges or at the very least physical keys, you can limit entrance strictly to hospital staff.
2020/08/10 21:31
When a patient arrives at the kiosk a staff member can enable two-way communication via an intercom to discuss their symptoms and help determine whether or not they can be permitted in the building
2020/08/10 21:31
Once inside the building, this same technology can be applied to certain floors or areas of the building where patients need more monitoring or have more urgent needs
2020/08/10 21:31
Maximizing Alert Systems
2020/08/10 21:31
The existing technology in dorms include fire panels, alarms, various sensors and emergency alert buttons
2020/08/10 21:31
More specifically, that alert can be assigned to a certain staff member or group rather than alerting everyone.
2020/08/10 21:31
By connecting all of your emergency alert systems you are able to communicate the right message to the right people at the right time.
2020/08/10 21:31