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Medline ® Abstracts for References 20-22 of 'Susceptibility to infections in persons with diabetes mellitus'

20
PubMed |
TI
Impaired leucocyte functions in diabetic patients.
AU
Delamaire M, Maugendre D, Moreno M, Le Goff MC, Allannic H, Genetet B 
SO
Diabet Med. 1997;14(1):29. 

This study evaluates polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) cell performance in 61 diabetic patients free of infection (40 Type 1, 21 Type 2), using tests that explore all the functional steps of PMN: (1) adherence: expression of adhesion molecules, CD 11a, CD 11b, CD 11c; nylon fiber adherence test; (2) chemotaxis under agarose towards the bacterial oligopeptide FMLP and complement fractions, used as attracting agents; (3) phagocytosis of opsonized latex microbeads; (4) bactericidal activity: chemiluminescence assessment of the oxidative killing potential before and after stimulation by opsonized zymosan and PMA; nitroblue tetrazolium reduction test. Results were analysed according to potentially influential factors: metabolic control (HbA1C, glycaemia), age of patient, type of diabetes, disease duration, and existence of vascular complications. PMN chemotaxis was significantly lower in patients than in healthy controls (p<0.001) and associated with spontaneous adherence and increased expression of adhesion molecules (CD 11b, CD 11c). The increased response to chemiluminescence reflects spontaneous activation of PMN cells and increased free radical production; after stimulation, response was lower than in controls. The type of diabetes, the age of patients, HbA1C level and disease duration did not affect the responses. Chemotaxis and chemiluminescence were further reduced in patients with vascular complications and hyperglycaemia. We conclude that all steps of PMN functioning are altered in diabetic patients, which may increase the risk of vascular complications and infectious episodes.

AD
Centre Régional de Transfusion Sanguine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Rennes, France. 
PMID
9017350
21
PubMed |
TI
Innate immune response mechanisms in non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus patients assessed by flow cytoenzymology.
AU
Llorente L, De La Fuente H, Richaud-Patin Y, Alvarado-De La Barrera C, Diaz-Borjón A, López-Ponce A, Lerman-Garber I, Jakez-Ocampo J 
SO
Immunol Lett. 2000;74(3):239. 

It is well known that infections in patients with diabetes mellitus are more severe, although there is controversy for increased susceptibility to them. Non-specific immune response mechanisms could be related to defense and/or susceptibility to pathogens. The aim of this study was to investigate the activity of several enzymes involved in the primary host defense mechanisms in non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Twenty NIDDM females with a mean HbA(1c) level of 8.19% were included. No patient had clinical evidence of infection. As controls 20 healthy females were studied. The enzymes tested were dipeptidyl-peptidase I (DPP-I), cathepsin B and D, NADPH oxidase and superoxide dismutase (oxidative burst) and collagenase. Isolated leukocytes were incubated with the specific substrates in pyrogen free conditions. The intracellular enzyme activity was analyzed by flow cytometry. Collagenase enzymatic activity was similar in the three leukocyte subpopulations studied. Oxidative burst induction in monocytes was comparable between both groups. Enzyme activity of cathepsin B and D in all cell subsets, oxidative burst in PMN cells, and DPP-I in lymphocytes and monocytes from patients, was higher than those from healthy females (P<0.05). Overall, our findings demonstrate an enhanced functional status of several intracellular leukocyte enzymes in NIDDM. Furthermore, the increased oxidative burst induction and the consequent production of free radicals, may contribute to vascular complications. Other mechanisms - either from the non-specific or specific immune response - deserve investigation to establish if diabetic patients are more susceptible to infectious diseases.

AD
Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de la Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Tlalpan. CP 14000, México, D.F., Mexico. lllryp@quetzal.innsz.mx 
PMID
11064109
22
PubMed |
TI
Handicaps to host defense. Effects of hyperglycemia on C3 and Candida albicans.
AU
Hostetter MK 
SO
Diabetes. 1990;39(3):271. 

The hyperglycemic patient remains persistently at risk for infectious complications. Whether ascribable to diabetes mellitus, to the administration of glucocorticoids, or to the infusion of hyperalimentation fluids, hyperglycemia may impair several mechanisms of humoral host defense, including such varied neutrophil functions as adhesion, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis. In addition, binding of glucose to the biochemically active site of the third component of complement C3 inhibits the attachment of this protein to the microbial surface and thereby impairs opsonization. Last, several pathogens frequently encountered in hyperglycemic patients possess unique mechanisms of virulence that flourish in the hyperglycemic environment. Most notable in this regard is the yeast Candida albicans, which expresses a glucose-inducible protein that is structurally and functionally homologous to a complement receptor on mammalian phagocytes. This protein promotes adhesion in the yeast and subverts phagocytosis by the host. Thus, hyperglycemia serves as a central mechanism in the predisposition of hyperglycemic patients to infection.

AD
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. 
PMID
2407580
Measure
Measure
Summary | 2 Annotations
adherencia, quimiopototaxis y fagocitosis
2021/05/04 02:44
afecta a la opsonización
2021/05/04 02:44