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Katsudon Japanese Pork Cutlet and Egg Rice Bowl

Katsudon Japanese Pork Cutlet and Egg Rice Bowl, by thewoksoflife.com

There was a time when my fish-averse younger self had very few options at a Japanese restaurant. I would suffer through plates of teriyaki and bowls of plain udon, as I watched the rest of my family dig into their raw fish, which I considered extremely unappetizing. One day, I finally opted for a dish that I’d passed over on the menu so many times before: Japanese Katsudon.

What Is Katsudon?

If you’ve never heard of it, Katsudon is basically katsu (a pork chop breaded with panko and fried) over rice with onion and egg. It was awesome, and it became my go-to choice whenever I went to a Japanese place–a fish-less, teriyaki-less haven.

Since then, I’ve discovered that sushi is, in fact, delicious and amazing, and I now order either sushi or sashimi at any Japanese restaurant I go to.

But every time, I’ll give a friendly little wave to the Katsudon option on the menu––an old friend. Well, the other day, I decided to make the dish at home, which, as it turns out, is a very simple task.

The results of this katsudon recipe were great–the crispy pork, paired with the slightly sweet mixture of egg and onion, all smushed into a pile of rice? What’s not to like?

Katsudon Recipe Instructions

Season the pounded pork chops with salt and pepper, and dust with a light, even coating of flour. In one shallow bowl, beat the egg. Put the panko into another shallow bowl.

Katsudon Japanese Pork Cutlet and Egg Rice Bowl, by thewoksoflife.com

Add thin, even layer of oil to a cast iron pan or skillet over medium heat. The oil is ready when you throw a panko breadcrumb into the oil and it sizzles. Dip the pork into the egg to coat.

Katsudon Japanese Pork Cutlet and Egg Rice Bowl, by thewoksoflife.com

Transfer the pork to the panko and press it evenly into the meat to get a good coating.

Carefully lay the pork chops in the hot oil and cook for 5-6 minutes on one side, until golden brown. Flip and cook the other side for another 5-6 minutes. Drain on a plate lined with a paper towel.

Katsudon Japanese Pork Cutlet and Egg Rice Bowl, by thewoksoflife.com

While the pork is resting, add the dashi stock (or chicken stock), sugar, soy sauce, and mirin to a small bowl. In another bowl, lightly beat 2 eggs. Add a tablespoon of oil to a pan over medium heat, and add the sliced onion. Fry the onions until they’re translucent and slightly caramelized.

Katsudon Japanese Pork Cutlet and Egg Rice Bowl, by thewoksoflife.com

Pour the stock mixture over the onions. Slice your tonkatsu into pieces and place on top of the onions.

Katsudon Japanese Pork Cutlet and Egg Rice Bowl, by thewoksoflife.com

Drizzle the egg over everything.

Katsudon Japanese Pork Cutlet and Egg Rice Bowl, by thewoksoflife.com

Cook over medium low heat until the egg is just set. Serve over bowls of steamed rice, and garnish with scallions.

Katsudon Japanese Pork Cutlet and Egg Rice Bowl, by thewoksoflife.com

Katsudon Japanese Pork Cutlet and Egg Rice Bowl, by thewoksoflife.com

Katsudon Japanese Pork Cutlet and Egg Rice Bowl, by thewoksoflife.com

Katsudon Japanese Pork Cutlet and Egg Rice Bowl, by thewoksoflife.com

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4.97 from 27 votes

Katsudon Japanese Pork Cutlet and Egg Rice Bowl

Katsudon is a fried, panko-breaded pork cutlet with egg over rice and a favorite of Japanese restaurant-goers. Our Katsudon recipe is easy to make at home!
by: Sarah
Course:Pork
Cuisine:Japanese
Keyword:katsudon
Katsudon
serves: 2 servings
Prep: 20 minutes
Cook: 20 minutes
Total: 40 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 center-cut (boneless pork chops, pounded down to a centimeter thick)
  • salt and pepper
  • flour (for dusting)
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup panko
  • oil (for frying)
  • 1/2 cup dashi stock or chicken stock
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons Mirin
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 medium onion (thinly sliced)
  • 2 servings steamed white rice
  • 1 scallion (chopped)

Instructions

  • Season the pounded pork chops with salt and pepper, and dust with a light, even coating of flour. In one shallow bowl, beat the egg. Put the panko into another shallow bowl.
  • Add thin, even layer of oil to a cast iron pan or skillet over medium heat. The oil is ready when you throw a panko breadcrumb into the oil and it sizzles. Dip the pork into the egg to coat. Transfer the pork to the panko and press it evenly into the meat to get a good coating.
  • Carefully lay the pork chops in the hot oil and cook for 5-6 minutes on one side, until golden brown. Flip and cook the other side for another 5-6 minutes. Drain on a plate lined with a paper towel.
  • While the pork is resting, add the stock, sugar, soy sauce, and Mirin to a small bowl. In another bowl, lightly beat 2 eggs. Add a tablespoon of oil to a pan over medium heat, and add the sliced onion. Fry the onions until they’re translucent and slightly caramelized.
  • Pour the stock mixture over the onions. Slice your tonkatsu into pieces and place on top of the onions. Drizzle the egg over everything. Cook over medium low heat until the egg is just set. Serve over bowls of steamed rice, and garnish with scallions.

nutrition facts

Calories: 688kcal (34%)Carbohydrates: 79g (26%)Protein: 48g (96%)Fat: 18g (28%)Saturated Fat: 6g (30%)Cholesterol: 335mg (112%)Sodium: 917mg (38%)Potassium: 857mg (24%)Fiber: 3g (12%)Sugar: 10g (11%)Vitamin A: 415IU (8%)Vitamin C: 5.2mg (6%)Calcium: 148mg (15%)Iron: 4.1mg (23%)

TheWoksofLife.com is written and produced for informational purposes only. While we do our best to provide nutritional information as a general guideline to our readers, we are not certified nutritionists, and the values provided should be considered estimates. Factors such as brands purchased, natural variations in fresh ingredients, etc. will change the nutritional information in any recipe. Various online calculators also provide different results, depending on their sources. To obtain accurate nutritional information for a recipe, use your preferred nutrition calculator to determine nutritional information with the actual ingredients and quantities used.

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Summary | 9 Annotations
There was a time when my fish-averse younger self had very few options at a Japanese restaurant. I would suffer through plates of teriyaki and bowls of plain udon, as I watched the rest of my family dig into their raw fish, which I considered extremely unappetizing. One day, I finally opted for a dish that I’d passed over on the menu so many times before: Japanese Katsudon.
2020/11/04 14:55
If you’ve never heard of it, Katsudon is basically katsu (a pork chop breaded with panko and fried) over rice with onion and egg. It was awesome, and it became my go-to choice whenever I went to a Japanese place–a fish-less, teriyaki-less haven.
2020/11/04 14:55
Season the pounded pork chops with salt and pepper, and dust with a light, even coating of flour. In one shallow bowl, beat the egg. Put the panko into another shallow bowl.
2020/11/04 14:55
Add thin, even layer of oil to a cast iron pan or skillet over medium heat. The oil is ready when you throw a panko breadcrumb into the oil and it sizzles. Dip the pork into the egg to coat.
2020/11/04 14:55
Transfer the pork to the panko and press it evenly into the meat to get a good coating. Carefully lay the pork chops in the hot oil and cook for 5-6 minutes on one side, until golden brown. Flip and cook the other side for another 5-6 minutes. Drain on a plate lined with a paper towel.
2020/11/04 14:55
While the pork is resting, add the dashi stock (or chicken stock), sugar, soy sauce, and mirin to a small bowl. In another bowl, lightly beat 2 eggs. Add a tablespoon of oil to a pan over medium heat, and add the sliced onion. Fry the onions until they’re translucent and slightly caramelized.
2020/11/04 14:55
Pour the stock mixture over the onions. Slice your tonkatsu into pieces and place on top of the onions.
2020/11/04 14:55
Drizzle the egg over everything.
2020/11/04 14:55
Cook over medium low heat until the egg is just set. Serve over bowls of steamed rice, and garnish with scallions.
2020/11/04 14:56