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  • “We don’t have the social contract we need,” he noted. “It’s much harder to be successful in America because we don’t believe everyone deserves things such as health insurance, jobs that pay a living wage and sick leave.
  • warned that the country’s inability to address these issues and build an adequate safety net is also now complicating the effort to control the coronavirus.
  • the Trump administration has been working since 2017 to roll back the rules under pressure from the food industry.
  • Meanwhile, even small efforts to tackle public health challenges like removing sodas and junk food from school vending machines have proved to be monumental tasks requiring years of advocacy
  • The roots of these imbalances run deep in American healthcare, dating back to efforts by physicians in the early 20th century to maintain control of medical care against a rising public health movement championed by government reformers.
  • Other wealthy nations invest up to twice as much on primary-care services and have substantially lower overall healthcare spending
  • “If there is a new medicine, there is just an assumption that it will get paid for, no matter the cost. But every public health policy requires a cost-benefit analysis that must show it not only improves health but saves money.”
  • America spends more than $237 billion a year on medical care for people with diabetes, for example, much of it to control a disease that can be prevented or mana
  • “It must be done by people working together on behalf of themselves and others. In a fiercely independent culture, that is very hard to undertake.”
  • “Public health is a quintessential public action
  • Similarly, the long-standing American resistance to public health measures hampers efforts to restrain diabetes, heart disease and other chronic illnesses that are driving hundreds of billions of dollars of medical spending.
  • his impulse to look for the latest and greatest medical intervention reflects a strong tradition in American healthcare that has long put a premium on new drugs, bigger medical systems and more technology, often at the expense of public health initiatives that other nations have shown to be more effective at lower cost.
  • It’s not just coronavirus: America repeatedly fails at public health
13 annotations
  • And get your vaccinations [for] flu and whatever else you need.”
  • “Older people should not neglect seeing their healthcare providers, now mor
  • Caplan says that when you consider that 60 percent of Americans have some kind of underlying health condition, that 40 percent of adults are obese, and that many aging Americans have heart health issues, it just makes sense that as a person ages, a COVID-19 battle gets more challenging.
  • The CDC now says, “People in their 50s are at higher risk for severe illness than people in their 40s. Similarly, people in their 60s or 70s are, in general, at higher risk for severe illness than people in their 50s. The greatest risk for severe illness from COVID-19 is among those aged 85 or older.
  • “The healthier our patients are, the better they do with COVID-19. Focus in earnest more than ever on your health. Across the board, the best outcomes come from this.”
  • Even those with type 2 diabetes who take medication may need injected insulin during treatment, he added.
  • “When [a person with diabetes] is in the hospital for this, their insulin needs go way up,” he said.
  • However, there is research that concludes people with diabetes can develop more serious cases of COVID-19.
  • First, there’s no evidence yet that people with diabetes are more likely to contract the novel coronavirus.
  • “Pregnancy is a stress on a healthy woman’s body.”That’s why, he said, a pregnant woman who contracts COVID-19 may face more severe outcomes.
  • By removing a set age cut off, the updated guidelines give notice to people with underlying conditions of all ages that they are more likely to end up in an intensive care unit (ICU) if they contract the viru
  • The updated guidelines also remove 65 as the age when more severe outcomes may occur
  • The agency is warning that people with type 2 diabetes, kidney disease, whole organ transplants, and women who are pregnant could experience more severe outcomes if they contract COVID-19.
  • CDC Expands List of Those with Higher COVID-19 Risks: What to Know
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  • The shared metrics and guidance will be incorporated into a number of initiatives and sites focused on COVID-19 response,
  • The idea is to take some of the guesswork out of the policy response at a local level, says Graeden, and offer a more standardized way to communicate the risk and the response options.
  • But in the absence of that clear guidance, this collaboration aims to fill the void.
  • , the risk levels are meant to signal the intensity of the effort needed to control COVID-19 and to trigger specific interventions
  • For the public, this means you can now compare the case incidence where you live to that of, say, a nearby county where you're considering going on an errand.
  • "It allows you to compare a rural area in upstate New York compared to New York City and have an apples-to-apples comparison for relative impact and relative caseload,"
  • This effort represents the consensus of eight institutions and more than a dozen individual experts who have agreed on these metrics.
  • What we really need is a shared vocabulary
  • This is by no means the only attempt to categorize risk levels across the United States. There are a number of frameworks out there using different measures. And that can lead to confusion, says Allen.
  • A community that has fewer than one daily new case per 100,000 is green. One to 9 is yellow; between 10 and 24 is orange; and 25 and above puts you in the red.
  • The collaboration launched these tools Wednesday, including a new, online risk-assessment map that allows people to check the state or the county where they live and see a COVID-19 risk rating of green, yellow, orange or red. The risk levels are based upon the number of new daily cases per 100,000 people.
  • "That's made it harder for people
  • "There hasn't been a unified, national approach to communicating risk
  • Green, Yellow, Orange Or Red? This New Tool Shows COVID-19 Risk In Your County
14 annotations
  • Amidst all of the pain, isolation, and destruction of the past six months, it’s not worth it to add on to the strain with two hours of excess Twitter every night
  • Feeling informed can be a salve, but being overwhelmed by tragedy serves no purpos
  • . The act of doomscrolling, then, is to roll toward annihilation. Or, to borrow a phrase from Joan Didion (writing during America’s last traumatic, generation-defining year, 1968), it is an act of slouching toward quietus.
  • Social media is helping people stay connected during lockdown, and as the conversation shifted away from Covid-19 and toward racial justice and the Black Lives Matter movement, it's become a tool for active engagement—spreading news about protests, bail funds, community resources—rather than just a forum for the passive consumption of pandemic updates. Yet the late-night digging, the endless reading of bad news, is draining.
  • Being able to participate in, and then opt out of, excessive social media use is, she notes, a privilege, which is why, when it comes to social media, many black users turn to Verzuz battles on Instagram Live and other forms of black joy as an act of resistance.
  • “So, doomscrolling can lead to the same long-term effects on mental health unless we mount interventions that address users’ behaviors and guide the design of social media platforms in ways that improve mental health and well-being.”
  • The doom and gloom isn’t all the media’s fault, though. Mesfin Bekalu, a research scientist at the Lee Kum Sheung Center for Health and Happiness at Harvard’s T. H. Chan School of Public Health, notes that while a lot of the news is bad, “as humans we have a ‘natural’ tendency to pay more attention to negative news.”
  • “Combine that with the fact that, socially, many of us are not going into work and standing around the coffee maker engaging in collective sense-making, and the result is we don’t have a lot of those social resources available to us in the same way.”
  • it can also lead to anxiety and depression.
  • that means there's a “lot of demand on cognitive processing to make sense of this. There’s no overarching narrative that helps us.” That, she adds, only compounds the stress and anxiety they're already feeling.
  • this habit has become known as doomsurfing, or “falling into deep, morbid rabbit holes filled with coronavirus content, agitating myself to the point of physical discomfort, erasing any hope of a good night’s sleep.”
  • Doomscrolling Is Slowly Eroding Your Mental Health
12 annotations
  • “Racism is a pandemic just like Covid-19 is a pandemic,” Casey said. “But we’ve been dealing with the coronavirus for, what, four months? We’ve had systematic oppression for 400-plus years.”
  • Some researchers have also linked the constant stress of being marginalized to a phenomenon called “weathering” – which accelerates ageing on a genetic level.
  • But pervasive discrimination within the medical system also contributes to bad health outcomes, she noted. “Black people aren’t believed when they’re in pain,” she said.
  • Housing segregation and racist housing policies have limited access to education and healthcare, and left minorities disproportionately exposed to toxic and cancer-causing chemicals in the water they drink, the air they breathe.
  • By focusing on health, activists were able to capture all the racist institutional and social structures that erode the wellbeing of Black and Brown people, Casey explained.
  • “If you declare something an emergency, you’re also saying it’s imperative to address the problem,” Agwu said.
  • In Cleveland, officials introduced the landmark resolution recognizing racism as a health emergency in early March, before the coronavirus pandemic had hit the city, and months before the demonstrators against police brutality took to the streets nationwide
  • Maternal mortality rates for Black women are two to three times greater compared to white women, and neighborhoods where the majority of residents are Black have the highest rates of lead poisoning.
  • Now, amid a national reckoning with entrenched inequality, lawmakers are finally hearing those alarms – and officially declaring racism a public health emergency
  • These declarations are “long overdue”, said Dr Allison Agwu, an infectious disease specialist and associate professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. As a physician on the frontlines of the coronavirus pandemic, Agwu said she had been amazed at how quickly the medical establishment mobilized to develop diagnostic tests, and produce thousands of research papers seeking a treatment and vaccine
  • ‘Long overdue’: lawmakers declare racism a public health emergency
11 annotations
  • more emphasis for us on supporting that mental health and helping those kids feel like they’re supported, and it’s OK to have whatever anxiety and stress they’re feeling,
  • The Be You Wellness program will serve more than 200 youth and will address mental and chronic health challenges. Staff will go through a new training program and lead kids in different activities.
  • their youth, especially those in the Black community, to know they’re there to help. “COVID, normal life, plus the events of the last three weeks, month since George Floyd absolutely has put a lot more emphasis for us on supporting that mental health and helping those kids feel like they’re supported, and it’s OK to have whatever anxiety and stress they’re feeling,” said Placzkowski. Dymond Cummings, another member participating in the program, thinks it’s important that kids address these challenges early on, so they have a better chance at a brighter future. “They have really opened me up because I was a shy little girl at first, like I didn’t really talk to anybody, but over all the years they have really shaped me into a bigger and better person, taught me how to be a leader,” said Cummings. The program will run into 2021 and is supported by the Grand Rapids Police Department, Grand Rapids Public Schools, Grand Rapids Community College and Stockbridge Business Association. —– Online: Boys & Girls of Grand Rapids Youth Commonwealth Copyright 2020 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. 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See the ListFind Attorney | Sponsored4 Worst Blood Pressure Drugs Simple Blood Pressure Fix Pennsylvania: Gov't Will Pay $271/month off Your Mortgage if You Apply NowMortgage BenefitsThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view our Privacy Policy and your opt out options here.Got it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel More Grand Rapids Stories 16th person charged in downtown Grand Rapids riot by WOODTV.com staff / Jul 1, 2020 GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) — Charges have been filed against another person in connection to the May 30 and May 31 riot in downtown Grand Rapids, prosecutors say. Kent County Prosecutor Chris Becker announced Wednesday that Howard Eugene Nall, 34, has been charged with one count of rioting, one count of malicious destruction of property and one count of breaking and entering. Read the Full Article (function () { try { var event = new CustomEvent( "nsDfpSlotRendered", { detail: { id: 'acm-ad-tag-leader_mr3-leader_mr3' } } ); window.dispatchEvent(event); } catch (err) {} })(); Goodbye, free parking: Grand Rapids resumes enforcement July 6 by Christa Ferguson / Jul 1, 2020 GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) — Drivers enjoying free parking at Grand Rapids meters: Your time is almost up. The city recently posted notices near meters warning drivers that parking enforcement will resume Monday. The message: “Pay your meter!” or get ready to pay for parking tickets. Read the Full Article COVID-19 limits ways you can cool down this summer by Whitney Burney / Jun 30, 2020 GRAND RAPIDS, Mich., (WOOD) — The city of Grand Rapids has limited options available for the public to cool down this year. County officials credit the COVID-19 pandemic. This summer, only two cooling centers are available to the public: Mel Trotter Ministries and Heartside Ministry in downtown Grand Rapids. Last year there were more than a dozen available. 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  • “It’s important for me to go to the protests because I feel like if they’re my people, even if they’re not my people, I feel like I should stand with them.”
  • With the coronavirus and systemic racism disproportionately affecting the Black community, the club wants to help with its new Be You Wellness program.
  • The Boys & Girls Club of Grand Rapids Youth Commonwealth is kicking off a new program to help kids focus on their mental health.
  • Boys & Girls Club launches mental health program
  • Grand Rapids by: Dana Whyte Posted: Jul 1, 2020 / 05:00 AM EDT / Updated: Jul 1, 2020 / 05:53 AM EDT {"mcp":"LIN","width":"100%","height":"100%","video":"5638267","autoplay":true,"expect_preroll":true,"pInstance":"p9","plugins":{"comscore":{"clientId":"6036439","c3":"woodtv.com","script":"//w3.cdn.anvato.net/player/prod/v3/plugins/comscore/comscoreplugin.min.js","useDerivedMetadata":true,"mapping":{"video":{"c3":"woodtv.com","ns_st_st":"wood","ns_st_pu":"Nexstar","ns_st_ge":"News"},"ad":{"c3":"woodtv.com","ns_st_st":"wood","ns_st_pu":"Nexstar","ns_st_ge":"News"}}},"dfp":{"adTagUrl":"https://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=1x1000&iu=/5678/lin.wood/news/grand_rapids&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vmap&unviewed_position_start=1&vid=short_onecue&cmsid=1234&url=https://www.woodtv.com/news/grand-rapids/boys-girls-club-launches-mental-health-program/&ciu_szs=728x90,300x250&ad_rule=1&description_url=https://www.woodtv.com/news/grand-rapids/boys-girls-club-launches-mental-health-program/&cust_params=vid%3D5638267%26cmsid%3D356543%26pid%3D356543%26vidcat%3D/news/grand_rapids%26bob_ck%3D[bob_ck_val]%26d_code%3Dna003"}},"accessKey":"qN1zdy1w0ggN6Umn7sgkuVd7q2AWkJo9","token":"eyJ0eXAiOiJKV1QiLCJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJ2aWQiOiI1NjM4MjY3IiwiaXNzIjoicU4xemR5MXcwZ2dONlVtbjdzZ2t1VmQ3cTJBV2tKbzkiLCJleHAiOjE1OTM2MzU1NDl9.aDfquJ3BjVZlGTCjmwCodNLCPFW2AnaYnKbBKOTiFlM","expectPrerollTimeout":8,"nxs":{"mp4Url":"https://nxsglobal.storage.googleapis.com/wood/video/video_studio/75/20/07/01/5638267/5638267_14CF04A2699E49618750E63BFB8ABA27_200701_5638267_Boys___Girls_Club_launches_mental_health_program_600.mp4"},"disableMutedAutoplay":false,"recommendations":true,"expectPreroll":true,"titleVisible":true,"trackTimePeriod":60} AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to SMSSMSShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) — The Boys & Girls Club of Grand Rapids Youth Commonwealth is kicking off a new program to help kids focus on their mental health. Officials say that 90 percent of the kids they serve are of color and 64 percent of them are African American. With the coronavirus and systemic racism disproportionately affecting the Black community, the club wants to help with its new Be You Wellness program. “I have been to the protests, most of the protests downtown,” said Myaja Dunning, a six-year member of the Boys & Girls Club of Grand Rapids. “It’s important for me to go to the protests because I feel like if they’re my people, even if they’re not my people, I feel like I should stand with them.” Dunning says focusing on mental health is crucial right now and she wants the club to help other kids the way it’s helped her. “Between school, my weight, I’ve struggled with my weight my whole life, they’ve made me happier overall,” said Dunning. The Be You Wellness program will serve more than 200 youth and will address mental and chronic health challenges. Staff will go through a new training program and lead kids in different activities. CEO Patrick Placzkowski says he wants their youth, especially those in the Black community, to know they’re there to help. “COVID, normal life, plus the events of the last three weeks, month since George Floyd absolutely has put a lot more emphasis for us on supporting that mental health and helping those kids feel like they’re supported, and it’s OK to have whatever anxiety and stress they’re feeling,” said Placzkowski. Dymond Cummings, another member participating in the program, thinks it’s important that kids address these challenges early on, so they have a better chance at a brighter future. “They have really opened me up because I was a shy little girl at first, like I didn’t really talk to anybody, but over all the years they have really shaped me into a bigger and better person, taught me how to be a leader,” said Cummings. The program will run into 2021 and is supported by the Grand Rapids Police Department, Grand Rapids Public Schools, Grand Rapids Community College and Stockbridge Business Association. —– Online: Boys & Girls of Grand Rapids Youth Commonwealth Copyright 2020 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Share this story AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to SMSSMSShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis (function () { try { var event = new CustomEvent( "nsDfpSlotRendered", { detail: { id: 'acm-ad-tag-mr1_mobile-mr1_mobile' } } ); window.dispatchEvent(event); } catch (err) {} })(); Around the WebThe Best Kept Secret to an Itch Free DogItch Relief Chews - Petlab2015 Dodge Dart SXTISEECARSThe Real Reason They're Keeping Americans HomeStansberry ResearchPennsylvania: Why Are People in Brookhaven Snapping Up This $89 AC Unit?Blaux Personal ACRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasySkincell ProThe States Where Americans Don't Want To Live AnymoreMoneyWise.comThe Most Successful Attorneys in Brookhaven. See the ListFind Attorney | Sponsored4 Worst Blood Pressure Drugs Simple Blood Pressure Fix Pennsylvania: Gov't Will Pay $271/month off Your Mortgage if You Apply NowMortgage BenefitsThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view our Privacy Policy and your opt out options here.Got it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel More Grand Rapids Stories 16th person charged in downtown Grand Rapids riot by WOODTV.com staff / Jul 1, 2020 GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) — Charges have been filed against another person in connection to the May 30 and May 31 riot in downtown Grand Rapids, prosecutors say. Kent County Prosecutor Chris Becker announced Wednesday that Howard Eugene Nall, 34, has been charged with one count of rioting, one count of malicious destruction of property and one count of breaking and entering. Read the Full Article (function () { try { var event = new CustomEvent( "nsDfpSlotRendered", { detail: { id: 'acm-ad-tag-leader_mr3-leader_mr3' } } ); window.dispatchEvent(event); } catch (err) {} })(); Goodbye, free parking: Grand Rapids resumes enforcement July 6 by Christa Ferguson / Jul 1, 2020 GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) — Drivers enjoying free parking at Grand Rapids meters: Your time is almost up. The city recently posted notices near meters warning drivers that parking enforcement will resume Monday. The message: “Pay your meter!” or get ready to pay for parking tickets. Read the Full Article COVID-19 limits ways you can cool down this summer by Whitney Burney / Jun 30, 2020 GRAND RAPIDS, Mich., (WOOD) — The city of Grand Rapids has limited options available for the public to cool down this year. County officials credit the COVID-19 pandemic. This summer, only two cooling centers are available to the public: Mel Trotter Ministries and Heartside Ministry in downtown Grand Rapids. Last year there were more than a dozen available. Read the Full Article .cls-1{fill:#fff;fill-rule:evenodd} Video (function () { try { var event = new CustomEvent( "nsDfpSlotRendered", { detail: { id: 'acm-ad-tag-leader_mr1-leader_mr1-story-pages' } } ); window.dispatchEvent(event); } catch (err) {} })(); Top Stories Pfizer reports encouraging, very early vaccine test results 262 more coronavirus cases confirmed in Michigan .cls-1{fill:#fff;fill-rule:evenodd} Video Lowell picks new police chief KDL delays reopening due to increased risk of virus Republicans, with exception of Trump, now push mask-wearing Stimulus check round 2: Jobs report on Thursday could be key .cls-1{fill:#fff;fill-rule:evenodd} Video (function () { try { var event = new CustomEvent( "nsDfpSlotRendered", { detail: { id: 'acm-ad-tag-leader_mr4-leader_mr4-facebook-users-only' } } ); window.dispatchEvent(event); } catch (err) {} })(); Citing racial bias, San Francisco will end release of mug shots 16th person charged in downtown Grand Rapids riot Deputies on scene of standoff in rural Ottawa County .cls-1{fill:#fff;fill-rule:evenodd} Video Goodbye, free parking: Grand Rapids resumes enforcement July 6 MI Supreme Court declines to hear Charles Pickett appeal Board finds it has authority on guns at Michigan Capitol Read more stories (function () { try { var event = new CustomEvent( "nsDfpSlotRendered", { detail: { id: 'acm-ad-tag-leader_mr2-leader_mr2' } } ); window.dispatchEvent(event); } catch (err) {} })(); More Stories Suspect accused of football game threat enters guilty plea Portion of ‘Dragon’ trail now open to bikers, hikers .cls-1{fill:#fff;fill-rule:evenodd} Gallery Report: Cause of large Kzoo fire undetermined KDPS: 2 teens arrested after ‘rolling gunfight’ Read more stories
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  • In recent years, Black celebrities in sports and entertainment — like former NBA star Ron Artest, radio personality Charlamagne Tha God and actress Taraji P. Henson — started openly advocating for the importance of mental health screening and support.
  • Can't you refer me to a Black psychiatrist?' And because there are so few of us, I'm limited in how many of those people's referrals I can make to their satisfaction,"
  • "I do think changing the workforce and changing the face of the workforce is probably the most critical thing that we can do now to start to address some of these issues," Shim says.
  • For many Black patients, access to mental health treatment often comes in places of last resort: Jails, schools, emergency rooms
  • ' we misdiagnose young people with things like 'conduct disorder' instead of the result of chronic trauma from racism," because many physicians haven't experienced it, Shim says
  • Misdiagnosis of Black people, Shim says, is still prevalent today — often by non-Black doctors who misread emotional cues like anger.
  • The need for mental health support, in other words, is great.
  • She worries most about Black girls, for whom suicide risk is increasing — not just among teenagers, but among preteens as well.
  • "We haven't been asked to publicly bear our pain as frequently as we are now, and we haven't had to witness other Black folks publicly baring their pain about it as frequently as we are now
  • Meanwhile, the economic barriers to accessing mental health care have only increased.
  • The need for mental health support is more evident than ever, especially among Black Americans, say people who study and experience the burden of racism
  • "Finding a Black therapist really saved me some time, and there was more connection, in terms of the kinds of struggles that I might feel or the the kinds of ways I might think about certain scenarios," Koerber say
  • 'Bear Our Pain': The Plea For More Black Mental Health Workers
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  • But this can be addressed by creating a database that does not include any personal information (such as an officer's address) and developing a system that prevents frivolous complaints from muddying the database
  • Of course, police unions will surely howl at any such requirement: They will complain about loss of privacy and point to the potential for abuse.
  • A broad, national mechanism for disclosure is necessary to make this project meaningful, both because police brutality occurs nationwide and because disgraced officers often shuffle between jurisdictions.
  • A database would also be a tremendous boon for both prosecutors and defense attorneys.
  • There are many reasons to make these disclosures public. Most obviously, it would allow the public to access important information which could reveal patterns of department-wide failures.
  • And even though the Minneapolis Police Department disclosed this information, it did not provide any additional details regarding the nature of those complaints. E
  • . A central feature of the system is a disclosure website, which makes it easy for members of the public to search for their brokers or run a background check on prospective ones. This is the perfect model for a national police disclosure scheme.
  • The new system made the track records of these securities brokers accessible to all. Why not do the same for every law enforcement officer in the United States?
  • Fortunately, a good model exists: the strikingly transparent national database on the people who handle our financial investments
  • . The order lays the foundation for a national database to track the use of excessive force, but only calls for police officers to be included when they are terminated, de-certified, convicted of a crime, or found liable in civil court.
  • How a finance database could help improve policing
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  • Through this website, users can create their own graphics and workspaces of any aspects of these transition scenarios, such as macro-economic development, changes in energy consumption, or the exploitation of energy resources. Users can also download the full dataset, or just those parts of the data that they need to work with.”
  • The overall goal is to provide tools for central banks and supervisors, policymakers, and financial actors, who aim to make finance greener and thus more sustainable – both for its own sake and for the sake of the planet
  • These arise for example from policy changes or technological development in the process of adjustment towards a low-carbon economy. Both risk types can heavily impact economies across the globe. But how precisely and under what conditions – that’s what our scenarios will help to illustrate and explore.”
  • Climate-related risks are very real to the global economy
  • The transition scenarios explore future changes to the energy system and the global economy if climate targets are met or not, and whether the transition to a low-carbon future happens in an orderly or disorderly fashion.
  • ScienceJune 24, 2020 11:14 pm AESTDate TimeShare New scenarios to help global finance go green(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});A key role of central banks is to strive for financial stability
  • ScienceJune 24, 2020 11:14 pm AESTDate TimeShare New scenarios to help global finance go green
7 annotations
  • Avoid masks with a valve in the front. That valve lets unfiltered air out, so it won't protect other people if you're contagious. And after all, protecting others is one of the main reasons to wear a mask in the first place.
  • air from the sides. Even so, surgical masks provide some benefit to the wearer as well: Laboratory testing has found that surgical masks block out 75% of respiratory-droplet-size particles.
  • . (Note: It has to cover your nose as well as your mouth.)
  • Researchers will tell you that masks won't provide full protection. And teasing out the science of masks will take time.
  • that this could dramatically reduce transmission of the virus and help prevent future waves of the pandemic
  • "The more people that were wearing a mask, the more protective it was," says MacIntyre, head of the biosecurity program at the Kirby Institute at the University of New South Wales in Australia. In other words, when everyone wore a mask, it protected the whole household.
  • The study found that in households where everyone was wearing a face mask indoors as a precaution before they knew anyone who lived there was sick, the risk of transmission was cut by 79%
  • It found that even loose-fitting surgical masks blocked almost all the contagious droplets the wearers breathed out and even also some infectious aerosols — tiny particles that can linger in the air
  • They're going to slam into the cloth mask. I think even a low-quality mask can block a lot of those droplets
  • but the stronger evidence is that masks protect others from catching an infection from the person wearing the mask. And infected people can spread the virus just by talking.
  • It's understandable if some people remain skeptical, since, at the beginning of the pandemic, public health officials in the U.S. said the general public didn't need masks. But that changed as it became clear that infected people can spread the coronavirus before they even show symptoms of COVID-19 or even if they never show symptoms
  • "I personally think that face masks are a key component of the non-pharmaceutical arsenal we have to combat COVID-19," says Shaman.
  • , if there is a policy around using face masks in place, it does actually come with a fairly large effect,"
  • While politicians spar over the topic, a growing number of scientific studies support the idea that masks are a critical tool in curbing the spread of the coronavirus.
  • People opposed to mask mandates have staged protests, and one local health official in Orange County, Calif., quit her job after receiving a death threat for a mask order.
  • Yes, Wearing Masks Helps. Here's Why
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  • He further added the financial strains are another source of anxiety for many, and while his counseling center will aim to assist patients in whatever way they can, therapists also need to be compensated in order continue their work.
  • Local groups such as the Community Presbyterian Counseling Center (CPCC) and Discovery Counseling Center of the San Ramon Valley, for example, provide extensive teletherapy services for patients. Brent Robery, clinical director at the Community Presbyterian Counseling Center, now utilizes video teleconferencing for therapy sessions, a move many mental health professionals have taken due to the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo by Ryan J. Degan) "There have been studies done (on therapy sessions) that telehealth therapy is just as effective as in-person therapy," Brent Robery, director of the CPCC, told the Weekly. "Some therapists since the shelter in place have gone exclusively to (teletherapy)." Depending on the mental health situation a patient is dealing with, teleconferencing is not necessarily right for everyone; however, Robery explained that teletherapy still offers patients a beneficial, and socially-distancing conscious, experience. "It is different. For example, you're not in the same room with each other so you might not be able to see some physical responses. However, there is also the opportunity that if you are not in the same room as each other; people have the ability to feel more open because they are not feeling judged," he said. Robery explained that while at first patients and even many therapists were hesitant to try telehealth, recently individuals have become more receptive to the idea. In fact, after first seeing a drastic drop in referrals, over the past couple of weeks more and more patients have begun seeking out therapy and counsel
  • he has also documented increased feelings of isolation, depression and anxiety, as well as abuse among individuals.
  • Depending on the mental health situation a patient is dealing with, teleconferencing is not necessarily right for everyone; however, Robery explained that teletherapy still offers patients a beneficial, and socially-distancing conscious, experience
  • Any patients worried about access to prescribed medications are also encouraged to ask their health care providers about getting 90-day supplies as opposed to a 60- or 30-day supply
  • In some cases certain patients have been required to shelter-in-place with their abuser. "A concern that is a very clear interest to me is the person's mental health," he added. "One of the things that I am very concerned about at this time is the suicidal patient, the patient that is isolated and alone, the patient who is not available and able to access community resources, perhaps because they are older and shut in and they don't know how to access care." Kostalnick encouraged county health officials to take these issues into account when crafting policies related to the shelter-in-place order and to consider the full health of a resident, both physical and mental. "In my view, (for coronavirus coverage) there's been very rare occasions that I've seen any reference to mental health, especially in the news and media," he said. When it comes to the practicality of meeting with patients, while he does provide telehealth services for patients who are comfortable with meeting online, Kostalnick is still able to meet with patients in-person as an essential business but he did implement certain safety precautions outlined by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • "One of the things that I am very concerned about at this time is the suicidal patient, the patient that is isolated and alone, the patient who is not available and able to access community resources, perhaps because they are older and shut in and they don't know how to access care.
  • According to Kostalnick, as a result of the pandemic and subsequent isolating shelter-in-place order, many patients have had recurring feelings of depression and anxiet
  • isolation and depression have become commonplace due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, and local mental health professionals want residents who are experiencing these issues to know that they are not alone and help is available.
  • News Staying Healthy: Mental health care during lockdown
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  • Many teenagers actually want their parents to get more involved in their online worlds
  • After Victoria Beckham made a TikTok video with her son, Romeo, the clip went viral.
  • in their kitchen in November went viral and got more than 200,000 likes.
  • Laughing and being goofy with each other has helped our family bond, but these exchanges are meant solely for the five of us, and we're mindful not to screenshot or forward content to anyone outside of our family, which might embarrass one of us. 
  • When Romeo joined the free social media app, which allows users to watch, create and share short videos, he wanted to stand out from the rest of TikTok's more than 1 billion users. He figured dancing with his famous mom would do it.
  • "Parents can get involved in their child's online life in ways that align with their family' core values," said Jordan Shapiro, author of the book, "The New Childhood; Raising Kids in a Connected World."
  • As I read more about TikTok, I learned that Beckham's hardly the only celebrity parent using the popular app to bond with her children. Courteney Cox, Kourtney Kardashian, Britney Spears, and Mark Cuban also all use TikTok with their kids.
  • Interestingly, many kids feel their parents don't care enough about their online lives, which is a missed opportunity, Graber said.
  • We hear so much about the dangers and problems online, but social media isn't all bad," Graber told Insider. "It's supposed to be social. Watching these videos of Victoria Beckham dancing and laughing with her son reminds us of the positives."
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  • Financial expert and New York Times best-selling author Suze Orman's "The 9 Steps to Financial Freedom: Practical and Spiritual Steps So You Can Spot Worrying" explains how people's relationships with money are influenced by their emotions.
  • save more money
  • In this book, Orman offers tips for paying off debt,
  • retirement accounts, and more. 2/11 2. 'The Total Money Makeover: A Proven Plan for Financial Fitness' by Dave Ramsey A simple, straightforward game plan for fixing your money habits. Amazon "The Total Money Makeover: A Proven Plan for Financial Fitness" is financial expert, radio host, and New York Times best-selling author Dave Ramsey's most popular book. In this revised and updated version, Ramsey distills his two decades of financial counseling experience into a seven-step plan for gaining total control over your money. 3/11 'Rich Dad Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money - That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not!' by Robert Kiyosaki Kiyosaki outlines important money lessons he learned from important figures in his life. Amazon This may sound like a book solely for dads, but it's not. Robert Kiyosaki's New York Times best-seller "Rich Dad Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not!" is about two "dads" who taught the Kiyosaki different perspectives about money: his actual father and his best friend's father. Kiyosaki uses the lessons he learned from his father figures to offers practical yet slightly counterintuitive financial advice, arguing that you don't need a high income to become wealthy and that a house isn't an asset, among other things. 4/11 4. 'Think and Grow Rich: The Landmark Bestseller - Now Revised and Updated for the 21st Century' by Napoleon Hill and Arthur Pell A revised version of the 1937 "Think and Grow Rich" original. Amazon Although "Think and Grow Rich" was originally published in 1937, its wisdom has stood the test of time. In the book, author Napoleon Hill presents his laws of financial success, which are drawn from his analysis of the lives of millionaires like Andrew Carnegie and Henry Ford. The updated version also features contemporary successful figures, like Bill Gates and Mary Kay Ash. 5/11 5. 'Secrets of Six-Figure Women: Surprising Strategies to Up Your Earnings and Change Your Life' by Barbara Stanny Stanny interviewed 150 women who made between $100,000 and $7 million. Amazon After conducting extensive research and interviewing hundreds of women who earn six-figure salaries, Barbara Stanny boiled down their insights to seven key strategies for achieving wealth. The journalist, motivational speaker, and financial educator discusses these methods in detail in "Secrets of Six-Figure Women: Surprising Strategies to Up Your Earnings and Change Your Life." For many people, saving more means earning more, and this book is a great place to start. 6/11 6. 'Unshakeable: Your Financial Freedom Playbook' by Tony Robbins Robbins is a life and business strategist who has coached more than 50 million people from 100 countries. Amazon New York Times best-selling author and motivational guru Tony Robbins collaborated with financial advisor Peter Mallouk for "Unshakeable: Your Financial Freedom Playbook." The book outlines how you can achieve financial peace of mind, boost your retirement savings, and make smart investments. 7/11 7. 'Love Your Life, Not Theirs: 7 Money Habits for Living the Life You Want' by Rachel Cruze Cruze shows you how to reframe your mentality about money. Amazon "Love Your Life, Not Theirs: 7 Money Habits for Living the Life You Want" is based on the concept that comparing yourself to others is a damaging habit — not only mentally, but also financially. New York Times best-selling author Rachel Cruze discusses how you can live the life you want by following seven core financial habits, like reframing the way you think about money, living on a plan, and avoiding debt. 8/11 8. 'The Automatic Millionaire, Expanded and Updated: A Powerful One-Step Plan to Live and Finish Rich' by David Bach Find out Bach's secret to becoming a millionaire. Amazon New York Times best-selling author David Bach wrote "The Automatic Millionaire, Expanded and Updated: A Powerful One-Step Plan to Live and Finish Rich" to address a question he had been asked repeatedly over the years: What's the secret to becoming a millionaire? His answer begins with an illustrative story of a couple making $55,000 a year who, through smart money management, put their kids through college, own two homes debt-free, and retired early with $1 million in the bank. He goes on to detail a practical system, complete with resources like websites and apps, that you can immediately put to work to help secure your finances. 9/11 9. 'The Financial Diet: A Total Beginner's Guide to Getting Good with Money' by Chelsea Fagan This personal finance book offers tips for making a budget, understanding investments, and dealing with credit. Amazon For younger readers looking to grasp basic financial principles, like creating a budget and managing credit, "The Financial Diet: A Total Beginner's Guide to Getting Good with Money" by Chelsea Fagan is a great choice. The author draws on expert advice to offer readers the tools they need to reach financial stability. It was named Best Book of 2018 by Refinery29 and was chosen as one of Real Simple's Most Inspiring Books for Graduates. 10/11 10. 'Broke Millennial: Stop Scraping By and Get Your Financial Life Together' by Erin Lowry Lowry shows readers, step-by-step, how to go from broke to financially savvy. Amazon A Washington Post "Color of Money" book club pick, "Broke Millennial: Stop Scraping By and Get Your Financial Life Together" uses humor, simple advice, and true stories to help young adults establish financial stability. Financial expert Erin Lowry addresses general money concepts, such as your relationship with money, as well as specific scenarios, like what to do when friends want to split a check evenly and you can only afford to cover the cost of your individual order. 11/11 11. 'You Are a Badass at Making Money: Master the Mindset of Wealth' by Jen Sincero Uncover what's holding you back from making money with Sincero's tips. Amazon New York Times best-selling author Jen Sincero urges readers to get past the stumbling blocks and fears that are keeping them from reaching financial success in "You Are a Badass at Making Money: Master the Mindset of Wealth." As someone who went through a positive financial transformation herself — going from living in a converted garage to jet-setting around the globe — Sincero has plenty of personal insights to share. In the book, she instructs readers how to tap into their natural money-making abilities, stop being victims to circumstances, and relate to money in a new way. Previous 1/11 Next SEE ALSO: 12 clever ways to save money every day, according to financial experts More: Features BI-freelancer Money Books Personal Finance financial advice BIStrategy     by Taboola by Taboola Sponsored Links Sponsored Links Promoted Links Promoted Links Recommended from the WebBabbelLanguage expert shares the secret to learning a language in 20 mins a dayBabbelUndoDrone 720XSelfie Quadcopter Shocks $country capitalized$. 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  • retirement accounts, and more. 2/11 2. 'The Total Money Makeover: A Proven Plan for Financial Fitness' by Dave Ramsey A simple, straightforward game plan for fixing your money habits. Amazon "The Total Money Makeover: A Proven Plan for Financial Fitness" is financial expert, radio host, and New York Times best-selling author Dave Ramsey's most popular book. In this revised and updated version, Ramsey distills his two decades of financial counseling experience into a seven-step plan for gaining total control over your money. 3/11 'Rich Dad Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money - That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not!' by Robert Kiyosaki Kiyosaki outlines important money lessons he learned from important figures in his life. Amazon This may sound like a book solely for dads, but it's not. Robert Kiyosaki's New York Times best-seller "Rich Dad Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not!" is about two "dads" who taught the Kiyosaki different perspectives about money: his actual father and his best friend's father. Kiyosaki uses the lessons he learned from his father figures to offers practical yet slightly counterintuitive financial advice, arguing that you don't need a high income to become wealthy and that a house isn't an asset, among other things. 4/11 4. 'Think and Grow Rich: The Landmark Bestseller - Now Revised and Updated for the 21st Century' by Napoleon Hill and Arthur Pell A revised version of the 1937 "Think and Grow Rich" original. Amazon Although "Think and Grow Rich" was originally published in 1937, its wisdom has stood the test of time. In the book, author Napoleon Hill presents his laws of financial success, which are drawn from his analysis of the lives of millionaires like Andrew Carnegie and Henry Ford. The updated version also features contemporary successful figures, like Bill Gates and Mary Kay Ash. 5/11 5. 'Secrets of Six-Figure Women: Surprising Strategies to Up Your Earnings and Change Your Life' by Barbara Stanny Stanny interviewed 150 women who made between $100,000 and $7 million. Amazon After conducting extensive research and interviewing hundreds of women who earn six-figure salaries, Barbara Stanny boiled down their insights to seven key strategies for achieving wealth. The journalist, motivational speaker, and financial educator discusses these methods in detail in "Secrets of Six-Figure Women: Surprising Strategies to Up Your Earnings and Change Your Life." For many people, saving more means earning more, and this book is a great place to start. 6/11 6. 'Unshakeable: Your Financial Freedom Playbook' by Tony Robbins Robbins is a life and business strategist who has coached more than 50 million people from 100 countries. Amazon New York Times best-selling author and motivational guru Tony Robbins collaborated with financial advisor Peter Mallouk for "Unshakeable: Your Financial Freedom Playbook." The book outlines how you can achieve financial peace of mind, boost your retirement savings, and make smart investments. 7/11 7. 'Love Your Life, Not Theirs: 7 Money Habits for Living the Life You Want' by Rachel Cruze Cruze shows you how to reframe your mentality about money. Amazon "Love Your Life, Not Theirs: 7 Money Habits for Living the Life You Want" is based on the concept that comparing yourself to others is a damaging habit — not only mentally, but also financially. New York Times best-selling author Rachel Cruze discusses how you can live the life you want by following seven core financial habits, like reframing the way you think about money, living on a plan, and avoiding debt. 8/11 8. 'The Automatic Millionaire, Expanded and Updated: A Powerful One-Step Plan to Live and Finish Rich' by David Bach Find out Bach's secret to becoming a millionaire. Amazon New York Times best-selling author David Bach wrote "The Automatic Millionaire, Expanded and Updated: A Powerful One-Step Plan to Live and Finish Rich" to address a question he had been asked repeatedly over the years: What's the secret to becoming a millionaire? His answer begins with an illustrative story of a couple making $55,000 a year who, through smart money management, put their kids through college, own two homes debt-free, and retired early with $1 million in the bank. He goes on to detail a practical system, complete with resources like websites and apps, that you can immediately put to work to help secure your finances. 9/11 9. 'The Financial Diet: A Total Beginner's Guide to Getting Good with Money' by Chelsea Fagan This personal finance book offers tips for making a budget, understanding investments, and dealing with credit. Amazon For younger readers looking to grasp basic financial principles, like creating a budget and managing credit, "The Financial Diet: A Total Beginner's Guide to Getting Good with Money" by Chelsea Fagan is a great choice. The author draws on expert advice to offer readers the tools they need to reach financial stability. It was named Best Book of 2018 by Refinery29 and was chosen as one of Real Simple's Most Inspiring Books for Graduates. 10/11 10. 'Broke Millennial: Stop Scraping By and Get Your Financial Life Together' by Erin Lowry Lowry shows readers, step-by-step, how to go from broke to financially savvy. Amazon A Washington Post "Color of Money" book club pick, "Broke Millennial: Stop Scraping By and Get Your Financial Life Together" uses humor, simple advice, and true stories to help young adults establish financial stability. Financial expert Erin Lowry addresses general money concepts, such as your relationship with money, as well as specific scenarios, like what to do when friends want to split a check evenly and you can only afford to cover the cost of your individual order. 11/11 11. 'You Are a Badass at Making Money: Master the Mindset of Wealth' by Jen Sincero Uncover what's holding you back from making money with Sincero's tips. Amazon New York Times best-selling author Jen Sincero urges readers to get past the stumbling blocks and fears that are keeping them from reaching financial success in "You Are a Badass at Making Money: Master the Mindset of Wealth." As someone who went through a positive financial transformation herself — going from living in a converted garage to jet-setting around the globe — Sincero has plenty of personal insights to share. In the book, she instructs readers how to tap into their natural money-making abilities, stop being victims to circumstances, and relate to money in a new way. Previous 1/11 Next SEE ALSO: 12 clever ways to save money every day, according to financial experts More: Features BI-freelancer Money Books Personal Finance financial advice BIStrategy     by Taboola by Taboola Sponsored Links Sponsored Links Promoted Links Promoted Links Recommended from the WebBabbelLanguage expert shares the secret to learning a language in 20 mins a dayBabbelUndoDrone 720XSelfie Quadcopter Shocks $country capitalized$. The Idea Is IncredibleDrone 720XUndoBlinkistThis Woman Reads 100 Books A MonthBlinkistUndoSave70.comHotels In Taiwan At Ridiculously Low PricesSave70.comUndoCruise-Compare.comIf you live in Tainan City you're eligible for these incredible cruise offersCruise-Compare.comUndoDelta WarsPlay this Game for 1 Minute and see why everyone in Tainan is addictedDelta WarsUndoForge Of Empires - Free Online GameThe Must-Play City Building Game of the YearForge Of Empires - Free Online GameUndowww.therapywithsaba.com4 Common Types of Prescription Drugs with High Addiction Potentialwww.therapywithsaba.comUndowww.bleubloom.com4 Healthy Smoothie Recipes To Make On The Gowww.bleubloom.comUndoTrips ShopPeople from Taiwan cannot believe these flight pricesTrips ShopUndo by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksVideos You May LikeJIM ROGERS: The worst crash in our lifetime is comingUndoThis London-based food truck only sells cheese sandwiches — here’s how they’re madeUndoA hair surgeon explains what's going on with Trump's hairUndoEverything we know about the mysterious SR-72 — Lockheed Martin's successor to the fastest plane everUndo     by Taboola by Taboola Sponsored Links Sponsored Links Promoted Links Promoted Links From The WebGrepolis - Online Free GameAre You Ready to Conquer Ancient Greece? Already 35 Million PlayersGrepolis - Online Free GameUndoVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 minute and see why everyone is addictedVikings: Free Online GameUndo
  • n this revised and updated version, Ramsey distills his two decades of financial counseling experience into a seven-step plan
6 annotations
 business and industrial 4273
  • the real issue is fear! There are a lot lies about investing people actually believe
  • The 2008 crash lasted for only 17 months. The market is up almost 380% in the nine years since the bottom of the crash.
  • When you invest money for the long-term – and that’s the only way you should – you’re playing the averages. And those always work in your favor.
  • , you should never invest in anything you can't explain to your grandmother.
  • The investment industry has made tremendous progress in the past few decades. Through the use of mutual funds, exchange traded funds (ETFs), online investing, and automated investment services, simple investment is now available for the average person.
  • people with lower incomes are less likely to invest. It's probably also a safe assumption people with a lot of debt also avoid it. But what about the rest?
  • If you invest in a diversified portfolio, which is the only way anyone should, there's historically no evidence you'll lose all your money.
  • If you simply ignored the crash, and held through it, not only would you not lose any money, but you'd actually be well ahead
  • You can cut your chances of losing all your money just by avoiding those two mistakes.
  • That's the bad news about that market. But there are actually two pieces of good news that are even more significant:
  • By not investing, you’re not preparing for retirement. And when you reach retirement age, you may be dependent on others to take care of you
  • The Consequences of Not Investing
  • A well-stocked investment portfolio is one of the best protections against job loss and other financial disasters.
  • A 2017 Gallup poll showed only 54% of Americans invest in the stock market, down from 62% in 2008
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  • This is true no matter what challenge you’re facing. Having a mindset that focuses on growth, opportunity, and the possibility of achieving your goals can help guide you to success. Likewise, having a mindset that’s locked in limiting beliefs about wh
  • A money mindset is a belief that you currently have about money. Usually, money mindsets aren’t conscious. You don’t usually decide what money mindsets we have, or how they impact your financial behaviors.
  • Money mindsets are developed based on your experiences. In other words, your culture and identity have helped to shape how you view money as an adult. 
  • A client, Danielle*, recently dealt with an unhealthy money mindset that was impacting her long-term ability to succeed. She was a first-generation college graduate, and she started out-earning her parents at age 26
  • The overwhelming belief that you don’t deserve the money you’re bringing home, even after working hard to earn a degree and to succeed in your career development, can bleed into all areas of your life - and cause you to put yourself in risky financial situations.
  • Being self-aware as you make financial decisions can help you to hit pause and take the full picture of your culture, background, and mindset into account before making a less-than-savvy money move. Remember: you have the power to acknowledge your background and your current money mindset, and choose to change them so that they serve you. 
  • Think about how you feel about money. How do you use it in your life? How does managing your finances make you feel?How did your community view money growing up? Were they living with a fear that resources would dry up? Did they avoid discussing money with you as a kid?Look at your experience, education, and expertise and realize - you deserve the money you’re making. You deserve to live well, and to enjoy your life. If it helps, write yourself a sticky note and put it on the mirror - there’s nothing wrong with earning money, wanting to earn more money, and wanting to use it in a way that makes you happy and supports your goals.Think twice before giving money to family members, or people in your community. It can help to create a line-item in your budget that’s specifically for giving money away. This will help you to prioritize your other financial goals (like emergency savings, retirement savings, or paying off student loans), while still leaving some wiggle room to support the ones you love and care about. Once you spend everything in the “giving” portion of your budget, you can honestly say that you don’t have anything left to give.Set “fun” money goals for yourself. There’s a temptation among first-generation college grads to only set reasonable, safe financial goals. While it’s important to save for the future, it’s also important to enjoy the wealth you have now. Don’t be afraid to set a goal to save for a special vacation, a big purchase, or other non-essential things. As long as your purchases align with your values, and you’re saving and spending wisely, there’s no reason that you don’t deserve to enjoy the money you’ve earned.
7 annotations
13 annotations
  • So what comes next? Is it a gentle slowdown or something more severe
  • , higher-yielding ­dividend-paying stocks have outperformed the market and have offered an attractive source of return.
  • We do expect growth to fade a bit as tariffs bite, and the impact of the tax cuts from this year won’t be as strong next year
  • Typically bull markets don’t die from old age. But they will die from either a recession or speculative excess. And right now we really don’t see either, although you start to see warning signs in both
  • Is the IPO market also overpriced
  • We don’t follow Tesla. But part of the reason is, their debt’s junk rated. We wouldn’t look at it until it becomes investment grade
  • Our turnover is about 20% a year. And when we make an investment, we are really thinking about a five-year investment time horizon
  • . But there’s another, super-fast-growing part of the business, which is driven by APIs [application programming interfaces, platforms for building new software].
  • Many people are very pessimistic about trade and tariffs—they’re worried about contagion. All you need is some good news there, and you see probably a very rapid rebound and a much better price performance
  • There’s been a lot of concern of late about a slowdown in China’s economy. Kate, how does China shape your thinking right now
  • Many people are looking at places like Argentina or Turkey and saying, “Oh, all emerging markets are this way.” Well, no, ­emerging markets have really shifted to be more China-focused,
11 annotations
 investing 7172
  • He has access to different types of investments (preferred stock, venture capital) that are often unavailable to non-wealthy people.
  • More than half of the company’s value is tied up in its stakes of Kraft, Coca-Cola, Wells Fargo, and IBM. Nearly 40% of Berkshire’s portfolio stems from the consumer staples sector, while another 30% is tied up in financials.
  • Buffett has said he hasn’t invested in tech because he doesn’t understand it. While it’s wise to avoid investing in something you don’t understand, it also means he’s missed out on some big gains over the years.
  • You’re Better Off With Mutual Funds and ETFs
  • investing like Warren Buffett isn’t easy, and an examination of Berkshire’s holdings indicates that average investors might not necessarily benefit by following his every move.
  • He Sometimes Invests With His Heart, Not His Head
  • He’s Missed Out on Technology
  • When tech took off in the 1990s, Warren Buffett was not on board. No big investments in Microsoft, Apple, or Cisco.
  • Warren Buffett is a great stock picker
  • But for most people, it’s foolish to try to invest in individual companies and expect to beat the broader stock market.
  • Mutual funds and exchange-traded funds offer the ability to invest in the broader stock market
  • Berkshire Hathaway’s investment motives, however, are far more complex. While it is focused on building wealth over the long-term, it also makes decisions to please its shareholders in the short-term. It makes acquisitions that don’t make sense immediately, but have a broader strategic valu
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