icon-cookie
The website uses cookies to optimize your user experience. Using this website grants us the permission to collect certain information essential to the provision of our services to you, but you may change the cookie settings within your browser any time you wish. Learn more
I agree
Alfonsino
157 articles
My Web Markups - Alfonsino
  • Data security will reinforce its positions
  • For the 2018 year it was common to consider VR (virtual reality software) to be the most significant achievement of our generation. However, the situation has dramatically changed. VR proved to have a limited range of application among the companies and the customers.
  • 2019 promises to become a year of AI technologies application in healthcare and medicine. People will face with a chance to get new opportunities, physical and mental capabilities they could not even dream of before. Humans will get a chance to modify, improve and continually upgrade their abilities and minds.
  • The range of cloud solutions and delivery models is getting bigger and bigger.
  • Also, biomedical electronics will take the stage. The digital technologies are to broaden the sphere of their competence in providing assistance doctors and mitigating the stressful situations.
  • we believe that cybersecurity will become more intelligence-driven in the upcoming year. Intelligence may become the only solution to the fast, automated attacks
  • Shortly these solutions will bring more flexibility and the abilities to react fast and even more efficiently to the rapidly changing market conditions. A new view on the cloud solutions adoption will be developed by the industries
  • The attributes like “connected”, “smart” or “intelligent” are now added to all technologies and solutions developed for various industries.
  • Reinforcement learning (RL) in its turn is a form of neural network that usually learns from its environment with the help of observation, actions, and rewards. Reinforcement learning has not been widely applied in various industries due to the existence of some obstacles and complications
  • Autonomous things like drones, robots and autonomous vehicles are rapidly developed along with AI solutions.
  • Actually we are the witnesses of the immense evolution of AI-powered chatbot technology. Starting with simple routine tasks, chatbots are now actively turning into AI assistants. Customers got used to them very fasts and now cannot even imagine dealing with some issues without AI assistance.
11 annotations
 internet technology 4677
  • The glove captures finger gestures and 3D postures to help its wearer experience the immersive technology in a distinctive way
  • For sight and sound, we have VR headsets. For touch, we have specially designed  VR gloves that act as a wearable interface.
  • Integrated into Exoglove, are sensors that make it possible for the glove to track hand posture with tremendous accuracy; plus it even covers a considerably wide range. The sensors are powered by 3 subsystems for tracking hand position, finger movement and haptic perception
  • Proof of concept is the aim of the game with these gloves. They aren’t aimed at gamers but rather at commercial users. Everything from a military simulation to a simulation of a new car design can benefit from the use of HaptX gloves
  • create human-like sensation, that’s simply down to the advanced vibrotactile actuators that have been incorporated into it – there are 10 of these actuators available. It is more of an upgrade on the Gloveone developed by the same company.
  • They boast a 5ms latency, full finger tracking (with plug and play, and quick calibration), and haptic feedback to give you a more immersed experience. Their breathable, environmentally friendly, and antibacterial material keeps them dry and clean; making them very low maintenance.
  • With a range of 6 different sensors connected to the HMD and gloves, you can experience your interactive experience without having to rely on 3rd party tracking devices
  • It boasts haptic feedback on each individual finger, 10ms latency, and a 10-hour battery life. 7 sensors track your fingers as precisely as possible in order to give you a seamless integration into your virtual world of choice. These were made with you in mind.
  • The gloves are tracked using cameras which makes it special impractical and rather inconvenient price wise. The reason for this, according to their chief scientist Michael Abrash, is because our hands have 25 degrees of freedom which makes it difficult for accurate tracking without cameras. The crispness in the video demonstration shows us that he clearly knows what he’s talking about.
  • It has 10 zones sensing and providing forces on each hand. This means that when you lift objects in the virtual world, you’ll actually feel them; from snowballs to baseballs, the difference in the objects are experienced by the user.
  • With a full range of hand motions and force feedback, this gadget will have you truly interacting with virtual reality.
11 annotations
  • Money spent on prisons cannot be spent on other things that might reduce crime more
  • along with previous convictions for drug possession and livestock neglect, forced the judge to sentence her to ten years in prison.
  • Each year she serves will cost taxpayers roughly $30,000—enough to pay the fees for three struggling students at the University of Iowa
  • Its incarceration rate rose fivefold between 1970 and 2008. Relative to its population, it now locks up seven times as many people as France, 11 times as many as the Netherlands and 15 times as many as Japan
  • For a fraction of the cost of locking them up, they could be fitted with GPS-enabled ankle bracelets that monitor where they are and whether they are taking drugs.
  • . A study in Argentina finds that low-risk prisoners who are tagged instead of being incarcerated are less likely to reoffend
  • Reserve prison for the worst offenders. Divert the less scary ones to drug treatment, community service and other penalties that do not mean severing ties with work, family and normality
  • Cognitive behavioural therapy—counselling prisoners on how to avoid the places, people and situations that prompt them to commit crimes—can reduce recidivism by 10-30%, and is especially useful in dealing with young offenders.
  • because mass incarceration breaks up families and renders many ex-convicts unemployable, it has raised the American poverty rate by an estimated 20%
  • Donald Trump’s attorney-general, Jeff Sessions, has just torn it up. This month he ordered prosecutors to aim for the harshest punishments the law allows,
  • The more people a country imprisons, the less dangerous each additional prisoner is likely to be. At some point, the costs of incarceration start to outweigh the benefits
  • prosecutors to avoid seeking the maximum penalties for non-violent drug offenders. This reform caused a modest reduction in the number of federal prisoners
12 annotations
  • Google has used Android as a vehicle to cement the dominance of its search engine," EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager told reporters. “These practices have denied rivals the chance to innovate and compete on the merits."
  • Google has used Android as a vehicle to cement the dominance of its search engine," EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager told reporters. “These practices have denied rivals the chance to innovate and compete on the merits
  • The EU said Google ensures that Google Search and Chrome are pre-installed on "practically all Android devices" sold in Europe. Users who find these apps on their phones are likely to stick with them and "do not download competing apps in numbers that can offset the significant commercial advantage derived on pre-installation.”
  • Google’s actions reduce the incentives for manufacturers to install and for users to seek out competing apps, it said
  • LISTEN TO ARTICLE 5:23 SHARE THIS ARTICLE Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email In this articleGOOGLALPHABET INC-A1,212.91USD-0.17-0.01%SPXS&P 5002,815.62USD+6.07+0.22%826938ZMOZILLA CORPPrivate CompanyUSDAAPLAPPLE INC190.40USD-1.05-0.55%AMZNAMAZON.COM INC1,842.92USD-1.01-0.05% Google received a record 4.3 billion-euro ($5 billion) antitrust fine from the European Union and was ordered to change the way it puts search and web-browser apps onto Android mobile devices
  • Google received a record 4.3 billion-euro ($5 billion) antitrust fine from the European Union and was ordered to change the way it puts search and web-browser apps onto Android mobile devices.
  • Alphabet shares were unchanged at $1,212.98 while the S&P 500 Index was little changed at 11:56 a.m. in New York.
  • Google received a record 4.3 billion-euro ($5 billion) antitrust fin
  • Last year, Google faced a then-record 2.4 billion-euro penalty following an investigation into shopping-search service.
  • Google declined to say what changes it might make to comply with the EU order.
10 annotations
 consumer electronics 7071
  • What your Facebook ‘likes’ say about you
  • (A Facebook spokesman told MarketWatch at the time that the study was not used to target vulnerable teenagers with advertisements, regretted that this study was carried out and said the contents of this study should not have been shared with a company
  • The company carried out research on the psychological states of teenagers and found “moments when young people need a confidence boos
  • Last month, Congress repealed laws passed by the Federal Communications Commission on what data internet service providers could collect on users.
  • during the 2016 election. Democratic voters who were shown content about candidate Hillary Clinton being ahead in the polls, for instance, may have become complacent and less likely to vote.
  • Michael Fauscette, chief research officer at peer-to-peer business review platform G2 Crowd, said both sides of the political divide used news stories to target Facebook users in different parts of the country
  • Kosinski noted that many people don’t mind being targeted with more relevant information — but feel cheated when it’s done without their knowledge.
  • Cambridge University’s Psychometrics Centre, said these tools were created to “access a history of behavior that might be more accurate than a survey” — and that isn’t always a bad thing. They have potentially life-saving applications in public health
  • his 2012 analysis of 58,000 volunteers using Facebook predicted a user’s skin color with 95% accuracy.
9 annotations
  • the results may have applications beyond culinary curiosities, such as enhancing the understanding of crack formation and how to control fractures in other rod-like materials such as multifiber structures, engineered nanotubes, or even microtubules in cells.
  • the forces at work when spaghetti — and any long, thin rod — is bent. They found that when a stick is bent evenly from both ends, it will break near the center, where it is most curved. This initial break triggers a “snap-back” effect and a bending wave, or vibration, that further fractures the stick. Their theory, which won the 2006 Ig Nobel Prize, seemed to solve Feynman’s puzzle. But a question remained: Could spaghetti ever be coerced to break in two?
  • Feynman’s kitchen experiment remained unresolved until 2005
  • the forces at work when spaghetti — and any long, thin rod — is bent. They found that when a stick is bent evenly from both ends, it will break near the center, where it is most curved. This initial break triggers a “snap-back” effect and a bending wave, or vibration, that further fractures the stick. Their theory, which won the 2006 Ig Nobel Prize, seemed to solve Feynman’s puzzle
  • The team found that if a stick is twisted past a certain critical degree, then slowly bent in half, it will, against all odds, break in two.
  • according to a new MIT study, is yes — with a twist. In a paper published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers report that they have found a way to break spaghetti in two
  • try this experiment: Pull out a single spaghetti stick and hold it at both ends. Now bend it until it breaks. How many fragments did you make? If the answer is three or more, pull out another stick and try again. Can you break the noodle in two? If not, you’re in very good company
  • “Taken together, our experiments and theoretical results advance the general understanding of how twist affects fracture cascades,” Dunkel says.
  • Heisser and Patil used the device to bend and twist hundreds of spaghetti sticks, and recorded the entire fragmentation process with a camera, at up to a million frames per second. In the end, they found that by first twisting the spaghetti at almost 360 degrees, then slowly bringing the two clamps together to bend it, the stick snapped exactly in two. The findings were consistent across two types of spaghetti: Barilla No. 5 and Barilla No. 7, which have slightly different diameters.
9 annotations
  • When the devices are being operated by humans, a lower resolution feed is used and the images are blurred. And the robots can’t identify the MAC numbers of nearby cellphones, he said.
  • The presence of video cameras in the robots is a potential privacy issue
  • Starship’s delivery robots work this way: Customers use a smartphone mobile application to order their delivery. A text alerts customers — “You have a robot waiting for you outside” — when the robot is near their home or business. A person must be present to receive the delivery because only the customer has a unique code to unlock the robot’s box.
  • ,
  • if somebody bothers the robot the operator [watching from a headquarters far away] can actually shout, ‘Hey! What are you doing? … The police are coming in five minutes
  • the robotic delivery invasion already has arrived in the form of machines that look like beer coolers on wheels scooting along the sidewalks
  • Ralston of Redwood City said test robots rolling around the city haven’t caused any issues so far. “People enjoy seeing the little robots. Or they completely ignore them
  • The Washington, D.C., Council opened the door to the machines by passing legislation last month that allows up to five different robot companies to operate
  • Autonomous devices use high-definition cameras that can take video of people and places from a sidewalk or from the air, as in the case of a drone. Scott questions: Who controls those images? How can they be used?
  • developed by the science fiction-sounding company Starship Technologies, will be showing up any day in the nation’s capital and in Redwood City, California. They could soon be in up to 10 cities, ferrying groceries and other packages over what the company calls the “last mile,” from a neighborhood delivery “hub” to your front door, all for as little as $1 a trip.
10 annotations