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Summary | 11 Annotations
Emotionally intelligent people aren’t immune to this knee-jerk reaction. They simply tend to more aware when it’s happening. That’s the crucial first step toward overcoming the urge to stay with the tried-and-true and move instead into uncharted territory
2018/01/11 09:56
Simply knowing your typical behavioral patterns and emotional drivers gives you an advantage in dealing with sudden new variables.
2018/01/11 09:56
“Vulnerability is not weakness, and the uncertainty, risk, and emotional exposure we face every day are not optional. Our only choice is a question of engagement
2018/01/11 09:56
the level to which we protect ourselves from being vulnerable is a measure of our fear and disconnection.”
2018/01/11 09:56
Change brings up feelings from both ends of the emotional spectrum: excitement and anxiety
2018/01/11 09:57
Don’t try to suppress that anxiety. “Acknowledge it, be thankful that the presence of the emotion keeps you grounded, and then move through it.”
2018/01/11 09:57
Recognizing your negative emotions is the prerequisite to managing and moving through them successfully
2018/01/11 09:57
adapting to change requires approaching new and untried initiatives with an open mind, and a willingness to take risks on them
2018/01/11 09:58
making a conscious effort to practice reading others’ body language can help you home in on and address what what your coworkers are feeling.
2018/01/11 09:58
Emotionally intelligent people don’t automatically revert to the old way of doing things as soon as a new approach falls short
2018/01/11 09:59
they typically avoid reacting until they’ve had a chance to think things through and decide how to move forward
2018/01/11 09:59