icon-cookie
The website uses cookies to optimize your user experience. Using this website grants us the permission to collect certain information essential to the provision of our services to you, but you may change the cookie settings within your browser any time you wish. Learn more
I agree
Summary | 9 Annotations
The marshmallow test is one of the most famous pieces of social-science research:
2018/06/06 09:31
tell her that she can have a second one if she can go 15 minutes without eating the first one, and then leave the room
2018/06/06 09:31
But a new study, published last week, has cast the whole concept into doubt.
2018/06/06 09:31
the classic marshmallow test, which was developed by the Stanford psychologist Walter Mischel in the 1960s.
2018/06/06 09:31
tracked how children went on to fare later in life.
2018/06/06 09:32
The original results were based on studies that included fewer than 90 children
2018/06/06 09:32
The researchers used a sample that was much larger—more than 900 children—and also more representative of the general population in terms of race, ethnicity, and parents’ education.
2018/06/06 09:32
the new study finds limited support for the idea that being able to delay gratification leads to better outcomes. Instead, it suggests that the capacity to hold out for a second marshmallow is shaped in large part by a child’s social and economic background
2018/06/06 09:33
the failure to confirm old assumptions pointed to an important truth: that circumstances matter more in shaping children’s lives than Mischel and his colleagues seemed to appreciate.
2018/06/06 09:33