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Derelict Mexico City house transformed into mixed-use venue

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Mexico City architects Francisco Pardo and Julio Amezcua have added an architectural "prosthesis" on top of a dilapidated brick residence to turn the building into offices and a co-working space.

The 19th-century house is located at Havre 77, in the central Juárez neighbourhood of the Mexican capital, just south of the Paseo de la Reforma thoroughfare.

Havre 77 by Francisco Pardo Arquitecto

It was once home to a wealthy family, before the revolutionary war and two major earthquakes drastically changed the area.

As part of a recent regeneration effort in the vicinity, the rendered brick building was renovated and extended to provide a mixed-use venue.

Havre 77 by Francisco Pardo Arquitecto

Pardo and Amezcua, who founded the firm AT103 together in 2001, overhauled the building to accommodate a restaurant called Havre 77, and added private and shared workspaces.

The main structural work includes a modern extension that piggybacks onto the three-storey original house, creating two extra floors on the roof and a full-height addition behind.

Havre 77 by Francisco Pardo Arquitecto

"Like the prosthesis of a human body, a new steel and concrete structure comprising two floors grips the top of the former brick building, while an additional branch lies at the back of it," said the architects.

Havre 77 by Francisco Pardo Arquitecto

The extension has ample glazing, and overlooks a verdant courtyard at the property's centre.

In the old house, period features like wall and ceiling mouldings are restored to their original glory, although some surfaces are left with a distressed look.

Havre 77 by Francisco Pardo Arquitecto


Contemporary lighting fixtures also contrast with the older decorative elements in the restaurant, where an oval-shaped bar is surrounded by wooden stools and small tables spill out onto a terrace.

Havre 77 by Francisco Pardo Arquitecto

"While evoking different eras through different languages, the existing building and the new additions are naturally integrated and complete each other like two sides of the same coin," the architects said.

Exposed bricks, timbers and concrete are found throughout the building – particularly the staircase that links all five floors.

Havre 77 by Francisco Pardo Arquitecto

By giving the old home a new lease of life, the project aims to catalyse further adaptive reuse developments in the area.

"This is not just a restoration, it's an intervention," said Pardo, who also founded Francisco Pardo Arquitecto. "Our project aims to change the DNA of a neighbourhood to respond to current social needs."

Havre 77 by Francisco Pardo Arquitecto

"Instilling new life-blood into an abandoned lot, Havre 77 opens onto to the street and brings it in, through an interstitial plaza on the south side," he added.

As part of the same regeneration programme, known as ReUrbano, Pardo has converted the house next at number 67 into another mixed-use space and a residence at the nearby Milàn 44 into a market.

Havre 77 by Francisco Pardo Arquitecto

Other Mexico City buildings that have recently received a revamp include a mid-century concrete structure turned into a contemporary art gallery and a derelict block converted to provide apartments, offices and shops.

Photography is by Diana Arnau.


Project credits:

Architects: Francisco Pardo Arquitecto and Julio Amezcua
Design team: Julio Amezcua, Karen Burkart, Victor Cruz, José Luis Fajardo, Alan Orozco, Francisco Pardo, Aarón Rivera, Vania Torres, Tiberio Wallentin
Real estate concept: Rodrigo Rivero Borrell Wheatley and Alberto Kritzler Ring

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Summary | 8 Annotations
City architects Francisco Pardo and Julio Amezcua have added an architectural "prosthesis" on top of a dilapidated brick residence to turn the building into offices and a co-working space. The 19th-century house is located at Havre 77, in the central Juárez neighbourhood of the Mexican capital, just south of the Paseo de la Reforma thoroughfare. It was once home to a wealthy family, before the revolutionary war and two major earthquakes drastically changed the area. As part of a recent regeneration effort in the vicinity, the rendered brick building was renovated and extended to provide a mixed-use venue. Pardo and Amezcua, who founded the firm AT103 together in 2001, overhauled the building to accommodate a restaurant called Havre 77, and added private and shared workspaces. The main structural work includes a modern extension that piggybacks onto the three-storey original house, creating two extra floors on the roof and a full-height addition behind. "Like the prosthesis of a human body, a new steel and concrete structure comprising two floors grips the top of the former brick building, while an additional branch lies at the back of it," said the architects. The extension has ample glazing, and overlooks a verdant courtyard at the property's centre. In the old house, period features like wall and ceiling mouldings are restored to their original glory, although some surfaces are left with a distressed look. Related story Cadaval & Sola-Morales transforms abandoned building in Mexico into apartments and offices Contemporary lighting fixtures also contrast with the older decorative elements in the restaurant, where an oval-shaped bar is surrounded by wooden stools and small tables spill out onto a terrace. "While evoking different eras through different languages, the existing building and the new additions are naturally integrated and complete each other like two sides of the same coin," the architects said. Exposed bricks, timbers and concrete are found throughout the building – particularly the staircase that links all five floors. By giving the old home a new lease of life, the project aims to catalyse further adaptive reuse developments in the area. "This is not just a restoration, it's an intervention," said Pardo, who also founded Francisco Pardo Arquitecto. "Our project aims to change the DNA of a neighbourhood to respond to current social needs." "Instilling new life-blood into an abandoned lot, Havre 77 opens onto to the street and brings it in, through an interstitial plaza on the south side," he added. As part of the same regeneration programme, known as ReUrbano, Pardo has converted the house next at number 67 into another mixed-use space and a residence at the nearby Milàn 44 into a market. Other Mexico City buildings that have recently received a revamp include a mid-century concrete structure turned into a contemporary art gallery and a derelict block converted to provide apartments, offices and shops. Photography is by Diana Arnau. Project credits: Architects: Francisco Pardo Arquitecto and Julio Amezcua Design team: Julio Amezcua, Karen Burkart, Victor Cruz, José Luis Fajardo, Alan Orozco, Francisco Pardo, Aarón Rivera, Vania Torres, Tiberio Wallentin Real estate concept: Rodrigo Rivero Borrell Wheatley and Alberto Kritzler Ring Read more Adaptive reuse Architecture co-working extensions Francisco Pardo Arquitecto Mexico Mexico City offices parasites More images and plans Basement floor plan Ground floor plan First floor plan Second floor plan Third floor plan Mezzanine floor plan Section one Section two Section three Share and comment Share: Leave a comment More Architecture Design Interiors More in Mexico City Riestra, Arnaud and Werz convert brutalist Mexico City ... David Chipperfield's Museo Jumex photographed by Rory Gardiner Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernandez pair rough concrete with ... Wedge-shaped balconies front Carlos Marín's skinny apartment ... Cadaval & Sola-Morales transforms abandoned building in ... Movie explores Luis Barragán's colourful Casa Gilardi in ... JSa lines Hotel Carlota courtyard with black concrete blocks Museum of Immortality forms annual pavilion for Design Week ... Comments Visit our comments page | Read our comments policy var disqus_url = 'https://www.dezeen.com/2016/12/26/havre-77-steel-concrete-derelict-co-working-mexico-city-francisco-pardo-julio-amezcua/'; var disqus_identifier = '1024133 https://admin.dezeen.com/?p=1024133'; var disqus_container_id = 'disqus_thread'; var disqus_shortname = 'dezeenhq'; var disqus_title = "Derelict Mexico City transformed into mixed-use venue"; var disqus_config_custom = window.disqus_config; var disqus_config = function () { /* All currently supported events: onReady: fires when everything is ready, onNewComment: fires when a new comment is posted, onIdentify: fires when user is authenticated */ this.language = ''; if (disqus_config_custom) { disqus_config_custom.call(this); } }; (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Next story NP2F Architectes squeezes football and tennis courts onto narrow Paris site Previous story HAO Design rearranges Taiwanese home to put emphasis on the garden googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1345801766776-5'); }); googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1345801766776-5'); }); googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1368014587923-1'); }); Top architecture stories Dezeen's review of 2016 Dezeen's Christmas gift guides 2016 Architecture Interiors Design Subscribe Subscribe to our newsletters Movies News googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1465481970645-0'); }); googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1465481970645-1'); }); googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1465481970645-2'); }); googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1465481970645-3'); }); googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1465481970645-4'); }); Interviews Competitions googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1380791691253-0'); }); Dezeen Watch Store Dezeen Jobs googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1346691541791-0'); }); Highlights Architecture Frank Lloyd Wright in colour Architecture Frank Lloyd Wright in colour Architecture Landscaped park for US-Mexico border Architecture Landscaped park for US-Mexico border 2016 review Biggest design trends of 2016 2016 review Biggest design trends of 2016 2016 review Biggest architecture trends of 2016 2016 review Biggest architecture trends of 2016 Highlights "Quiet revolution" in universities Highlights "Quiet revolution" in universities 2016 review Top 10 stories of 2016 2016 review Top 10 stories of 2016 Design Designer Christmas cards Design Designer Christmas cards Design Pentagram branding targets tampon tax Design Pentagram branding targets tampon tax Design Four centuries of eyewear Design Four centuries of eyewear 2016 review Top 10 interiors of 2016 2016 review Top 10 interiors of 2016 Highlights Flat with space-saving solutions Highlights Flat with space-saving solutions Architecture Birch-lined garden studio Architecture Birch-lined garden studio Architecture Extension with concertina rooflight Architecture Extension with concertina rooflight Highlights "Micro hotel" in New York Highlights "Micro hotel" in New York Architecture Snøhetta's crinkled museum extension Architecture Snøhetta's crinkled museum extension Architecture Frank Lloyd Wright in colour Architecture Frank Lloyd Wright in colour Architecture Landscaped park for US-Mexico border Architecture Landscaped park for US-Mexico border 2016 review Biggest design trends of 2016 2016 review Biggest design trends of 2016 2016 review Biggest architecture trends of 2016 2016 review Biggest architecture trends of 2016 Highlights "Quiet revolution" in universities Highlights "Quiet revolution" in universities 2016 review Top 10 stories of 2016 2016 review Top 10 stories of 2016 Design Designer Christmas cards Design Designer Christmas cards Design Pentagram branding targets tampon tax Design Pentagram branding targets tampon tax Design Four centuries of eyewear Design Four centuries of eyewear 2016 review Top 10 interiors of 2016 2016 review Top 10 interiors of 2016 Share:
2016/12/28 02:25
architects Francisco Pardo and Julio Amezcua have added an architectural "prosthesis" on top of a dilapidated brick residence to turn the building into offices and a co-working space
2016/12/28 02:26
the rendered brick building was renovated and extended to provide a mixed-use venue.
2016/12/28 02:26
The extension has ample glazing, and overlooks a verdant courtyard at the property's centre.
2016/12/28 02:27
n the old house, period features like wall and ceiling mouldings are restored to their original glory, although some surfaces are left with a distressed look. Related story Cadaval & Sola-Morales transforms abandoned building in Mexico into apartments and offices Contemporary lighting fixtures also contrast with the older decorative elements in the restaurant, where an oval-shaped bar is surrounded by wooden stools and small tables spill out onto a terrace. "While evoking different eras through different languages, the existing building and the new additions are naturally integrated and complete each other like two sides of the same coin," the architects said. Exposed bricks, timbers and concrete are found throughout the building – particularly the staircase that links all five floors. By giving the old home a new lease of life, the project aims to catalyse further adaptive reuse developments in the area. "This is not just a restoration, it's an intervention," said Pardo, who also founded Francisco Pardo Arquitecto. "Our project aims to change the DNA of a neighbourhood to respond to current social needs." "Instilling new life-blood into an abandoned lot, Havre 77 opens onto to the street and brings it in, through an interstitial plaza on the south side," he added. As part of the same regeneration programme, known as ReUrbano, Pardo has converted the house next at number 67 into another mixed-use space and a residence at the nearby Milàn 44 into a market. Other Mexico City buildings that have recently received a revamp include a mid-century concrete structure turned into a contemporary art gallery and a derelict block converted to provide apartments, offices and shops. Photography is by Diana Arnau. Project credits: Architects: Francisco Pardo Arquitecto and Julio Amezcua Design team: Julio Amezcua, Karen Burkart, Victor Cruz, José Luis Fajardo, Alan Orozco, Francisco Pardo, Aarón Rivera, Vania Torres, Tiberio Wallentin Real estate concept: Rodrigo Rivero Borrell Wheatley and Alberto Kritzler Ring Read more Adaptive reuse Architecture co-working extensions Francisco Pardo Arquitecto Mexico Mexico City offices parasites More images and plans Basement floor plan Ground floor plan First floor plan Second floor plan Third floor plan Mezzanine floor plan Section one Section two Section three Share and comment Share: Leave a comment More Architecture Design Interiors More in Mexico City Riestra, Arnaud and Werz convert brutalist Mexico City ... David Chipperfield's Museo Jumex photographed by Rory Gardiner Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernandez pair rough concrete with ... Wedge-shaped balconies front Carlos Marín's skinny apartment ... Cadaval & Sola-Morales transforms abandoned building in ... Movie explores Luis Barragán's colourful Casa Gilardi in ... JSa lines Hotel Carlota courtyard with black concrete blocks Museum of Immortality forms annual pavilion for Design Week ... Comments Visit our comments page | Read our comments policy var disqus_url = 'https://www.dezeen.com/2016/12/26/havre-77-steel-concrete-derelict-co-working-mexico-city-francisco-pardo-julio-amezcua/'; var disqus_identifier = '1024133 https://admin.dezeen.com/?p=1024133'; var disqus_container_id = 'disqus_thread'; var disqus_shortname = 'dezeenhq'; var disqus_title = "Derelict Mexico City transformed into mixed-use venue"; var disqus_config_custom = window.disqus_config; var disqus_config = function () { /* All currently supported events: onReady: fires when everything is ready, onNewComment: fires when a new comment is posted, onIdentify: fires when user is authenticated */ this.language = ''; if (disqus_config_custom) { disqus_config_custom.call(this); } }; (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Next story NP2F Architectes squeezes football and tennis courts onto narrow Paris site Previous story HAO Design rearranges Taiwanese home to put emphasis on the garden googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1345801766776-5'); }); googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1345801766776-5'); }); googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1368014587923-1'); }); Top architecture stories Dezeen's review of 2016 Dezeen's Christmas gift guides 2016 Architecture Interiors Design Subscribe Subscribe to our newsletters Movies News googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1465481970645-0'); }); googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1465481970645-1'); }); googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1465481970645-2'); }); googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1465481970645-3'); }); googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1465481970645-4'); }); Interviews Competitions googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1380791691253-0'); }); Dezeen Watch Store Dezeen Jobs googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1346691541791-0'); }); Highlights Architecture Frank Lloyd Wright in colour Architecture Frank Lloyd Wright in colour Architecture Landscaped park for US-Mexico border Architecture Landscaped park for US-Mexico border 2016 review Biggest design trends of 2016 2016 review Biggest design trends of 2016 2016 review Biggest architecture trends of 2016 2016 review Biggest architecture trends of 2016 Highlights "Quiet revolution" in universities Highlights "Quiet revolution" in universities 2016 review Top 10 stories of 2016 2016 review Top 10 stories of 2016 Design Designer Christmas cards Design Designer Christmas cards Design Pentagram branding targets tampon tax Design Pentagram branding targets tampon tax Design Four centuries of eyewear Design Four centuries of eyewear 2016 review Top 10 interiors of 2016 2016 review Top 10 interiors of 2016 Highlights Flat with space-saving solutions Highlights Flat with space-saving solutions Architecture Birch-lined garden studio Architecture Birch-lined garden studio Architecture Extension with concertina rooflight Architecture Extension with concertina rooflight Highlights "Micro hotel" in New York Highlights "Micro hotel" in New York Architecture Snøhetta's crinkled museum extension Architecture Snøhetta's crinkled museum extension Architecture Frank Lloyd Wright in colour Architecture Frank Lloyd Wright in colour Architecture Landscaped park for US-Mexico border Architecture Landscaped park for US-Mexico border 2016 review Biggest design trends of 2016 2016 review Biggest design trends of 2016 2016 review Biggest architecture trends of 2016 2016 review Biggest architecture trends of 2016 Highlights "Quiet revolution" in universities Highlights "Quiet revolution" in universities 2016 review Top 10 stories of 2016 2016 review Top 10 stories of 2016 Design Designer Christmas cards Design Designer Christmas cards Design Pentagram branding targets tampon tax Design Pentagram branding targets tampon tax Design Four centuries of eyewear Design Four centuries of eyewear 2016 review Top 10 interiors of 2016 2016 review Top 10 interiors of 2016 Share:
2016/12/28 02:27
In the old house, period features like wall and ceiling mouldings are restored to their original glory, although some surfaces are left with a distressed look. Related story Cadaval & Sola-Morales transforms abandoned building in Mexico into apartments and offices Contemporary lighting fixtures also contrast with the older decorative elements in the restaurant, where an oval-shaped bar is surrounded by wooden stools and small tables spill out onto a terrace. "While evoking different eras through different languages, the existing building and the new additions are naturally integrated and complete each other like two sides of the same coin," the architects said. Exposed bricks, timbers and concrete are found throughout the building – particularly the staircase that links all five floors. By giving the old home a new lease of life, the project aims to catalyse further adaptive reuse developments in the area. "This is not just a restoration, it's an intervention," said Pardo, who also founded Francisco Pardo Arquitecto. "Our project aims to change the DNA of a neighbourhood to respond to current social needs." "Instilling new life-blood into an abandoned lot, Havre 77 opens onto to the street and brings it in, through an interstitial plaza on the south side," he added. As part of the same regeneration programme, known as ReUrbano, Pardo has converted the house next at number 67 into another mixed-use space and a residence at the nearby Milàn 44 into a market. Other Mexico City buildings that have recently received a revamp include a mid-century concrete structure turned into a contemporary art gallery and a derelict block converted to provide apartments, offices and shops. Photography is by Diana Arnau. Project credits: Architects: Francisco Pardo Arquitecto and Julio Amezcua Design team: Julio Amezcua, Karen Burkart, Victor Cruz, José Luis Fajardo, Alan Orozco, Francisco Pardo, Aarón Rivera, Vania Torres, Tiberio Wallentin Real estate concept: Rodrigo Rivero Borrell Wheatley and Alberto Kritzler Ring Read more Adaptive reuse Architecture co-working extensions Francisco Pardo Arquitecto Mexico Mexico City offices parasites More images and plans Basement floor plan Ground floor plan First floor plan Second floor plan Third floor plan Mezzanine floor plan Section one Section two Section three Share and comment Share: Leave a comment More Architecture Design Interiors More in Mexico City Riestra, Arnaud and Werz convert brutalist Mexico City ... David Chipperfield's Museo Jumex photographed by Rory Gardiner Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernandez pair rough concrete with ... Wedge-shaped balconies front Carlos Marín's skinny apartment ... Cadaval & Sola-Morales transforms abandoned building in ... Movie explores Luis Barragán's colourful Casa Gilardi in ... JSa lines Hotel Carlota courtyard with black concrete blocks Museum of Immortality forms annual pavilion for Design Week ... Comments Visit our comments page | Read our comments policy var disqus_url = 'https://www.dezeen.com/2016/12/26/havre-77-steel-concrete-derelict-co-working-mexico-city-francisco-pardo-julio-amezcua/'; var disqus_identifier = '1024133 https://admin.dezeen.com/?p=1024133'; var disqus_container_id = 'disqus_thread'; var disqus_shortname = 'dezeenhq'; var disqus_title = "Derelict Mexico City transformed into mixed-use venue"; var disqus_config_custom = window.disqus_config; var disqus_config = function () { /* All currently supported events: onReady: fires when everything is ready, onNewComment: fires when a new comment is posted, onIdentify: fires when user is authenticated */ this.language = ''; if (disqus_config_custom) { disqus_config_custom.call(this); } }; (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Next story NP2F Architectes squeezes football and tennis courts onto narrow Paris site Previous story HAO Design rearranges Taiwanese home to put emphasis on the garden googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1345801766776-5'); }); googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1345801766776-5'); }); googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1368014587923-1'); }); Top architecture stories Dezeen's review of 2016 Dezeen's Christmas gift guides 2016 Architecture Interiors Design Subscribe Subscribe to our newsletters Movies News googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1465481970645-0'); }); googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1465481970645-1'); }); googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1465481970645-2'); }); googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1465481970645-3'); }); googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1465481970645-4'); }); Interviews Competitions googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1380791691253-0'); }); Dezeen Watch Store Dezeen Jobs googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1346691541791-0'); }); Highlights Architecture Frank Lloyd Wright in colour Architecture Frank Lloyd Wright in colour Architecture Landscaped park for US-Mexico border Architecture Landscaped park for US-Mexico border 2016 review Biggest design trends of 2016 2016 review Biggest design trends of 2016 2016 review Biggest architecture trends of 2016 2016 review Biggest architecture trends of 2016 Highlights "Quiet revolution" in universities Highlights "Quiet revolution" in universities 2016 review Top 10 stories of 2016 2016 review Top 10 stories of 2016 Design Designer Christmas cards Design Designer Christmas cards Design Pentagram branding targets tampon tax Design Pentagram branding targets tampon tax Design Four centuries of eyewear Design Four centuries of eyewear 2016 review Top 10 interiors of 2016 2016 review Top 10 interiors of 2016 Highlights Flat with space-saving solutions Highlights Flat with space-saving solutions Architecture Birch-lined garden studio Architecture Birch-lined garden studio Architecture Extension with concertina rooflight Architecture Extension with concertina rooflight Highlights "Micro hotel" in New York Highlights "Micro hotel" in New York Architecture Snøhetta's crinkled museum extension Architecture Snøhetta's crinkled museum extension Architecture Frank Lloyd Wright in colour Architecture Frank Lloyd Wright in colour Architecture Landscaped park for US-Mexico border Architecture Landscaped park for US-Mexico border 2016 review Biggest design trends of 2016 2016 review Biggest design trends of 2016 2016 review Biggest architecture trends of 2016 2016 review Biggest architecture trends of 2016 Highlights "Quiet revolution" in universities Highlights "Quiet revolution" in universities 2016 review Top 10 stories of 2016 2016 review Top 10 stories of 2016 Design Designer Christmas cards Design Designer Christmas cards Design Pentagram branding targets tampon tax Design Pentagram branding targets tampon tax Design Four centuries of eyewear Design Four centuries of eyewear 2016 review Top 10 interiors of 2016 2016 review Top 10 interiors of 2016 Share:
2016/12/28 02:27
In the old house, period features like wall and ceiling mouldings are restored to their original glory, although some surfaces are left with a distressed look
2016/12/28 02:28
the existing building and the new additions are naturally integrated and complete each other like two sides of the same coin
2016/12/28 02:29