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Summary | 15 Annotations
Japan has some of the longest working hours in the world, and some young Japanese workers are literally working themselves to death.
2017/06/06 01:30
"He usually worked until the last train, but if he missed it he slept at his desk," she said. "In the worst case he had to work overnight through to 10pm the next evening, working 37 hours in total."
2017/06/06 01:30
Two years later Naoya died at the age of 27 from an overdose of medication.
2017/06/06 01:31
was officially rule a case of "karoshi" - the Japanese term to describe death attributed to overwork.
2017/06/06 01:31
On Christmas Day in 2015, 24-year-old Matsuri Takahashi, an employee at the Japanese advertising agency Dentsu, jumped to her death.
2017/06/06 01:31
working more than 100 hours of overtime a month in the period leading up to her death.
2017/06/06 01:31
particularly for new starters in a company.
2017/06/06 01:31
young workers think they don't have any other choice," he tells me. "If you don't quit you have to work 100 hours. If you quit you just can't live.
2017/06/06 01:32
Nearly a quarter of Japanese companies have employees working more than 80 hours overtime a month, often unpaid,
2017/06/06 01:32
Those numbers are important; 80 hours overtime a month is regarded as the threshold above which you have an increased chance of dying.
2017/06/06 01:32
the challenge has been to break a decades-old work culture
2017/06/06 01:33
a district of downtown Tokyo, they have resorted to turning the office lights off at 7pm in an effort to force people to go home.
2017/06/06 01:33
The only solution they say is to put a legal limit on the overtime employees are permitted to work.
2017/06/06 01:33
The Japanese people count on the government but they are being betrayed," says Koji Morioka, an academic who has studied the karoshi phenomenon for 30 years.
2017/06/06 01:34
"Companies just focus on short-term profits," she says. "My son and other young workers don't hate work. they are capable and they want to do well.
2017/06/06 01:34